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Running Hyper-V Server 2012 R2 from SSD or fast USB 3.0?


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Hey all,

 

as I explore Hyper-V server for the first time, I'm tempted to look into running it from a fast USB 3.0 stick to free up a valuable SATA socket on my motherboard.

 

My question is: if I run Hyper-V server from a fast 3.0 USB stick (like this), how much slower will it be than running it from an SSD?

 

I'll place the VMs on an SSD and have a decent amount of RAM so hopefully they wont be limiting factors.

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Sorry can't help with your question because I am very new to HyperV as well. What I would like to know is what are the advantages/disadvantages of running HyperV bear-metal vs a Windows 10 install running HyperV?

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Thanks for the link - that was what I was going to use to give it a go!

My question was more about whether the move to USB would be significantly slower to boot & use than sticking to an SSD?

 

Sent from my SM-G920F using Tapatalk

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Drashna Jaelre

I use a normal, spinning HDD for HyperV (the OS), and it runs the system just fine.

All my VM storage is SSD though.

 

So a USB flash drive should be comparable, at least.

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I use a normal, spinning HDD for HyperV (the OS), and it runs the system just fine.

All my VM storage is SSD though.

 

So a USB flash drive should be comparable, at least.

What I would like to know is what are the advantages/disadvantages of running HyperV bear-metal vs a Windows 10 install running HyperV?

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Drashna Jaelre

What I would like to know is what are the advantages/disadvantages of running HyperV bear-metal vs a Windows 10 install running HyperV?

 

Well, WIndows 10 Pro (yes, requires Pro) has a GUI, making it easier to manage.

However, it uses more resources for all the additional features and programs running. 

 

 

Basically, it really depends on what you're doing. If you're running one or two "small" VMs, then Windows 10 is probably a better host system. But if you're running a lot of VMs, a dedicated HyperV system may be a much better idea.

 

 

Also, user authentication is a problem.

On Windows 10, it's very simple, as you don't need to remotely manage it. The HyperV Server builds are command line and require that you enable remote management to be able to properly access the system. This also includes setting up user authentication, which is a PITA.  HVRemote makes this easier, but it's still problematic.

That said, HyperV Server joined to a domain makes things much simpler, especially if you use Group Policies to enable remote management. 

Edited by Drashna Jaelre
user authentication issues
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Well, WIndows 10 Pro (yes, requires Pro) has a GUI, making it easier to manage.

However, it uses more resources for all the additional features and programs running. 

 

 

Basically, it really depends on what you're doing. If you're running one or two "small" VMs, then Windows 10 is probably a better host system. But if you're running a lot of VMs, a dedicated HyperV system may be a much better idea.

Thank you for the explanation & clearing this up for me.

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