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could you suggest an ssd..


capall
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Hi all,

I'd like to replace the hard drive in my lenovo thinkpad T420, and I was thinking of getting an SSD to make it run faster. I see that I could get a WD black 750G for about $60, so I would like to spend about that on the SSD.  I keep all my files on  whs2011 so a high capacity drive is not necessary. Looks like $60 will get you a 250GB SSD, which should be fine. While I'm familiar with WD drives, I have no idea about SSD's, so any suggestions would be much appreciated.

 

thanks

Derek

 

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Can't go wrong with the Samsung SSD drives.  The 250Gb Evo 850 is just over $80 right now, but they seem drop in price or go on sale frequently.  The Thinkpads work great with them -- I have two in my Thinkpad X230.

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Crucial SSDs in my experience have been reliable. I've got 3 of them in laptops/desktops and all have been reliable.

 

I've had terrible experiences in the past with OCZ so I avoid that brand but that was before they were bought by Toshiba so no idea about now.

 

Samsung in theory are good but they've had a few technical issues with some of their older drives which has put some people off. I believe the latest drives are fine so don't buy older generation Samsung SSDs. I've got 3 M.2 Samsung SSDs with NVMe interface in a server as vFRC in vSphere and no problems there. Make sure your motherboard supports NVMe though before buying a NVMe SSD. Otherwise stick with SATA ones.

 

I'm not impressed by the previous undocumented changes to Kingston SSDs and they've got dubious business practices regarding actual internals of their SD cards. If you get one of their SSDs and you're okay with performance then AFAIK, they're okay SSDs.

 

Indifferent about Sandisk. I've got a small Sandisk SSD for vFRC in vSphere on a Gen8 Microserver and it works okay.

Edited by GotNoTime
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SAMSUNG 850 EVO 2.5" 250GB SATA III 3-D Vertical Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) MZ-75E250B/AM   $82

Crucial BX200 2.5" 240GB SATA III Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) CT240BX200SSD1  $65

 

both good options then, yes?

 

Is there any significance to the "3D vertical" in samung naming , and MLC in the Crucial naming

 

thanks

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Be careful on power specs, some SSD draw more power than spinning 2.5" drives. They create too much heat for laptops. Samsung and SanDisk are good candidates for low power. These guys do great reviews on SSD, especially around power:

http://www.anandtech.com/

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Is there any significance to the "3D vertical" in samung naming , and MLC in the Crucial naming

3D vertical just means that they're using fancy new technology which stacks multiple flash dies inside the chip. The specific kind they're using is something only Samsung uses AFAIK. You don't really need to worry about this.

 

MLC means Multi Level Cell as opposed to SLC which is Single Level Cell. Flash storage works by having a "bucket" that stores an electrical charge. It can change the amount of charge stored in each bucket and the charge will stay there for a very long time if nothing disturbs it. Each storage "bucket" in the flash chip is either fully charged or empty for SLC but for MLC, it'll have at least 4 different levels. The extra levels means it can store more data but that also comes with a corresponding reduction in reliability and speed since it has to carefully determine what the precise charge is. Pretty much all consumer SSDs and flash drives are MLC due to the lower cost for storage but high end enterprise SSDs will be SLC since reliability is paramount. You don't need to care about this unless you're doing something unusual with your storage requirements. You may see TLC mentioned which is Triple Level Cell which is a type of MLC.

 

The previous Samsung issues I mentioned were due to a new type of flash they were using in an older generation of their SSDs. The charge in the cells would slowly degrade over time and the controller would have difficulty reading the data. It would have to repeatedly read old cells to determine what the actual value was which caused performance to dive. Rewriting the cells would give it a fresh charge so performance would go back up again. As it was an actual physical process, Samsung weren't able to fix this properly in existing SSDs. They masked it by modifying the SSD controller firmware to continually rewrite the contents of the SSD when it was idle.

Edited by GotNoTime
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thanks guys, yes marketing terms indeed.

 

And is there any general issues or disadvantages in using an ssd vs a standard drive

 

thanks

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thanks guys, yes marketing terms indeed.

SLC vs MLC can be important depending on what you're doing so I wouldn't call it a marketing term. The 3D Vertical "feature" is however.

 

And is there any general issues or disadvantages in using an ssd vs a standard drive

  • You pay far more for X amount of SSD storage instead of HD storage.
  • HDs are generally a much more refined technology since they've had decades to work on it and there usually aren't bizarre bugs or data corruption unlike SSDs where the manufacturers will completely change the controller + firmware in new models. If somebody comes out with a brand new SSD that has a new type of flash or has a new controller then best to wait before buying it.
  • If a SSD dies then there isn't very much you can do about it. If it does die then you'll either get sudden immediate death or mysterious corruption. The old tricks with HDs such as chilling it in an attempt to make it work for just enough time to recover data won't work on a SSD. Hope you've got good backups.
  • SSD flash cells have a limited lifespan and will eventually wear out from constant writes but usually the amount of data required to do so is so vast that you're unlikely to reach it in normal operation. Again, this is important for enterprise applications. Not so much for consumer unless you're doing something unusual. HDs will wear out due to mechanical failure eventually anyway.
Edited by GotNoTime
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