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950 Pro .2 and SpinRite


Poppapete
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Nothing special. It is just doing a surface scan and if it finds bad sectors, it'll read repeatedly until it thinks it has the real data and then write it again to hopefully remap it. The rest of it is just fancy technobabble.

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Many other programs can read all sectors on a disk or ssd. I use hd Sentinel and stablebit scanner these days because they support drives larger than 2 TB and I do not have to take down the system for scanning. Spinrite has pretty much lost my support. A new version to fix the drive limitations and speed has been announced years ago and never materialized. It's vapor ware.

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  • 4 weeks later...

SpinRite is an old dinosaur that refuses to take the hint and go extinct.  It was questionable back when it came out (which I think was about 18 years ago?), and it's beyond useless and possibly dangerous now.

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SpinRite is an old dinosaur that refuses to take the hint and go extinct.  It was questionable back when it came out (which I think was about 18 years ago?), and it's beyond useless and possibly dangerous now.

 

That old dinosaur saved a lot of people's bacon in the day.

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That old dinosaur saved a lot of people's bacon in the day.

Including me.  I would be using it if it wasn't limited to 2TB disks.  But it ain't going to happen!

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That old dinosaur saved a lot of people's bacon in the day.

 

I'm sure it did.  It's not 1998 any more, though.

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  • 3 weeks later...

For me, an overnight run (3 hours) restored performance on a failing 1TB Samsung 840 EVO mSATA SSD. A fix? No. Interesting? Yes. I do certainly wish I had recorded video of the situation, but I don't publish anything without at least some numbers to back it up, see benchmarks before and after here:

https://tinkertry.com/aomei-backupper

 

I still had to RMA the SSD, but it sure made working with the SSD that last month a lot faster, for whatever admittedly "snake oil" sounding reasons. It was one of those nothing to lose situations, and I don't claim other tools couldn't have helped. But I was running out of tools (and time) to try.

 

Steve and Father Robert do attempt to explain a bit about how this works here:

http://pca.st/wq55#t=7300

 

Yeah, I'm a skeptic too, but I do find I learn better by tinkering myself, then publishing, gets things vetted in a hurry if I go wrong, and I certainly don't have any desire to spread misinformation.

 

My recent Spinrite experience with this 840 was rather surprising to me too, even if it was just one data point.

 

It is an ancient tool that saved me some failing TiVo HDDs too, which I then cloned to a new HDD. Worth its price many times over for me, since I maintained so many systems (and TiVos) for extended family.

 

Listening to Security Now, I honestly believe Steve will come out with a new version someday, he has not dropped it. He's just a busy guy. No simple feat, in this world of UEFI BIOSs and >2TB drives.

 

If nothing else, a fun tweet came out of my experimentation with an NVMe drive, where it amazingly, it still works:

https://twitter.com/paulbraren/status/692875142817386497

with Samsung Magician helping me keep an eye on TBW. No issues there.

 

I'm not trying to dig up an old thread, or restart a time consuming argument, where nobody wins. I'm happy to let this thread stay dead. Just felt there was a little more context (perhaps) worth adding, that's all.

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For me, an overnight run (3 hours) restored performance on a failing 1TB Samsung 840 EVO mSATA SSD. A fix? No. Interesting? Yes. I do certainly wish I had recorded video of the situation, but I don't publish anything without at least some numbers to back it up, see benchmarks before and after here:

https://tinkertry.com/aomei-backupper

 

I still had to RMA the SSD, but it sure made working with the SSD that last month a lot faster, for whatever admittedly "snake oil" sounding reasons. It was one of those nothing to lose situations, and I don't claim other tools couldn't have helped. But I was running out of tools (and time) to try.

The 840 EVO had a faulty design where the charge in the flash cells would leak away over time much faster than normal. This would cause issues for the controller as it wouldn't be able to reliably read the cell and would require repeated attempts.

 

The manual "fix" is to rewrite all your data. Copy it off. Copy it back on. The flash cells would get fully recharged and the thresholds between the values are all nice and distinct. Your SSD performance will be like new again until it eventually degraded again over time. This is all Spinrite is doing but you could just do it yourself easily.

 

The "fix" released by Samsung is to alter the SSD firmware to quietly rewrite your data when the SSD isn't busy. You'll lose some of the endurance of the flash by doing this but you don't get the severe performance issues.

 

TL;DR - Spinrite will temporarily "fix" the performance issues on a 840 EVO but so will the copy command.

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For spinning disks,   spinrite can be  life saver but its too slow and wonky to be anything but a last resort

 

I am not counting on a upgrade from steve gibson -   considering this  has been his income for 20 some years, he  seems to go off into rat holes on other projects that lead to no where

 

 

with regards to its use on SSD's      From Steve's and GotNoTime's description of why spinrite may be helpful in some situations. 

 

It seems to me that  DriveScanner from Covecube does basically the same thing -  and does it in a modern and elegant manner.  

 

 

 

There are other programs perhaps ( drive sentinel) that may also work. 

 

perhaps we can get some comments on this from the experts in the forum ( Drashna, Tinkererguy)

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