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e_merlin

Raid setup for home use - what do you recommend?

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jmwills

The controller becomes a single point of failure.

 

In business, you have support contracts, so the manufacturer replaces a faulty component for the lifetime of the support contract. Most home users do not have support contracts, so if the RAID controller goes, bye bye all your data. That's a pretty big risk!

 

You may then have to resort to buying a 2nd hand controller on Ebay, assuming they are still available, and in any case you would be many days/weeks without your data.

 That's why you have backups!  RAID is not a backup solution.

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ShadowPeo

 That's why you have backups!  RAID is not a backup solution.

 

^^^^^ This

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pcdoc

The controller becomes a single point of failure.

 

In business, you have support contracts, so the manufacturer replaces a faulty component for the lifetime of the support contract. Most home users do not have support contracts, so if the RAID controller goes, bye bye all your data. That's a pretty big risk!

 

You may then have to resort to buying a 2nd hand controller on Ebay, assuming they are still available, and in any case you would be many days/weeks without your data.

 

There is some truth to the single point failure but you could argue that about any piece of hardware.   I fail to see how that would deter me or anyone from using RAID to help in protecting my data and as part of a good backup strategy. I run the same controller in all my servers and keep one backup controller just in case.  I have already had a controller go bad a few years ago (not the on-board controller) and was able to pop in the current model of the same MFG and was up in no time much the same way you would in any other component.  I know that is not always the case hence the backup, but most MFG have some level of backward compatibility for at least one or two generations.  As for your comment on a bigger problem, will have to disagree.  These failures were confirmed and replaced by WD.  There have been other reports of drives in the same lot that have had higher than normal failure rates.  I know it sounds odd but as I have north of 65 drives at home, I am pretty sure this is drive related.  If I was reading this I would however think the same you did based on strictly statistics.

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rotor

 That's why you have backups!  RAID is not a backup solution.

Clearly nobody read my post.

 

So as long as you have backups, it's perfectly fine to have a bunch of 100% healthy hard drives with data that you can't access because the controller died?

 

Please.

There is some truth to the single point failure but you could argue that about any piece of hardware.   I fail to see how that would deter me or anyone from using RAID to help in protecting my data and as part of a good backup strategy. I run the same controller in all my servers and keep one backup controller just in case.  I have already had a controller go bad a few years ago (not the on-board controller) and was able to pop in the current model of the same MFG and was up in no time much the same way you would in any other component.  I know that is not always the case hence the backup, but most MFG have some level of backward compatibility for at least one or two generations.  As for your comment on a bigger problem, will have to disagree.  These failures were confirmed and replaced by WD.  There have been other reports of drives in the same lot that have had higher than normal failure rates.  I know it sounds odd but as I have north of 65 drives at home, I am pretty sure this is drive related.  If I was reading this I would however think the same you did based on strictly statistics.

Everything about my setup is generic. Generic drives, generic SATA controllers, generic NTFS file system... Anything can fail, and I can get at my data in any number of ways. That is my point about RAID controllers (which are proprietary by their nature). And my comment about something bigger was just a suggestion without knowing anything about you, if you have 65 drives then I'd say statistically 2 drives is probably not bad.

Edited by rotor

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itGeeks

How can introducing RAID involve more risk?  That doesn't make sense, at least not to me.

Agreed, Its no more risk then using hard drives in fact its less of a risk because you are using RAID for drive fault tolerance.

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jmwills

It's funny how people want to run servers at home but treat them like desktops.

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itGeeks

The controller becomes a single point of failure.

 

In business, you have support contracts, so the manufacturer replaces a faulty component for the lifetime of the support contract. Most home users do not have support contracts, so if the RAID controller goes, bye bye all your data. That's a pretty big risk!

 

You may then have to resort to buying a 2nd hand controller on Ebay, assuming they are still available, and in any case you would be many days/weeks without your data.

That would be called having spare components, Anyone that knows what they are doing will always purchase a spare of things like hard drives, RAID controllers so they are prepared for disaster. From my experience you don't always have to purchase the same model of the RAID controller as long as you stick with the same company, I use to use HighPoint Rocket Raid controllers and I had some fail and just replaced them with another model from HighPoint and everything was fine, No lose of data. But that said you want to be safe then purchase 2 of things like Hard Drives, RAID controllers, Switches & Routers. That said for anyone portraying that single disk over RAID is a better option is just not true, RAID is a much better & safer way of going no matter what the risk because your data will most likely stay online and you wont have to restore from backups witch takes more time. I for one never want to have to restore from backups unless all else fails, Its way to time consuming to deal with but I do have 5 different backups spread across the globe if needed but I have never once needed the backups & I plan on keeping it that way.

Edited by itGeeks

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itGeeks

It's funny how people want to run servers at home but treat them like desktops.

True & those are the same people that want to run true server OS's on Desktop mother boards then complain somthing is not working. I been in this game for 30+ years and made my share of mistakes by trying to do things on the cheap side only to later spend 2 to 3 times the money later on to do it right. Now I purchase the correct hardware for the application and things work much better now. This includes purchasing extra parts to have on hand in case of component failure.

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itGeeks

There is some truth to the single point failure but you could argue that about any piece of hardware.   I fail to see how that would deter me or anyone from using RAID to help in protecting my data and as part of a good backup strategy. I run the same controller in all my servers and keep one backup controller just in case.  I have already had a controller go bad a few years ago (not the on-board controller) and was able to pop in the current model of the same MFG and was up in no time much the same way you would in any other component.  I know that is not always the case hence the backup, but most MFG have some level of backward compatibility for at least one or two generations.  As for your comment on a bigger problem, will have to disagree.  These failures were confirmed and replaced by WD.  There have been other reports of drives in the same lot that have had higher than normal failure rates.  I know it sounds odd but as I have north of 65 drives at home, I am pretty sure this is drive related.  If I was reading this I would however think the same you did based on strictly statistics.

Well said and I agree with you 100%

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rotor

It's funny how people want to run servers at home but treat them like desktops.

 

Anyone that knows what they are doing

 

True & those are the same people that want to run true server OS's on Desktop mother boards then complain somthing is not working. I been in this game for 30+ years

 

I wasn't aware this forum called "Home Server Show" was populated by IT Professionals discussing enterprise level solutions. Rather, I was under the distinct impression that this was for home users trying to get advice about home solutions.

 

You guys are more than welcome to use RAID, and you seem to be very thorough. I certainly have never come across so many people that have spares of every last component in their home setup. That is fantastic, and I do not doubt that you have a very robust setup. But come on, that is not a realistic solution for 99% of home users. Most home users simply need/want a Synology, and a tiny proportion of those want to go the extra step of owning a MicroServer so they can tinker a bit more. Please don't give out misleading information saying "RAID is best, RAID is awesome, you should RAID all the things", when it's clear that most users a) do not understand the complexities and the drawbacks, b ) cannot afford to hold spares of everything, and c) may or may not have the technical abilities to troubleshoot when things go wrong.

 

Also, it would be nice if you would lay off the ad-hominem attacks, just because someone offers a different view to yours. You are clearly old-timers (not age-wise, I mean just looking at your post count), but I came in here all enthusiastic and all you have managed to do is put me off.

Edited by rotor

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