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e_merlin

Raid setup for home use - what do you recommend?

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GotNoTime

We still need to talk about drive scrubbing, prediction of failure and data destaging!  :)

ZFS is the future IMO but you need a fairly powerful box to run it with good performance. It basically has all of the features you could possibly want from your storage system. Multi tier caching, deduplication, storage pools, data scrubbing, snapshots, striping etc...
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schoondoggy

ZFS is the future IMO but you need a fairly powerful box to run it with good performance. It basically has all of the features you could possibly want from your storage system. Multi tier caching, deduplication, storage pools, data scrubbing, snapshots, striping etc...

I agree, I am playing with it. The advanced features seem to like CPU, memory and several disks.

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itGeeks

White label drives tend to come from OEM's so they could have special firmware or special settings like non-standard sector counts. I have never had an issue with WL drives from GoHardDrives.com. All WL drives I have gotten from them have standard firmware. The 5TB could be a Red or Green. You should email them to see. The only concern I have about bigger drives in NAS boxes relates to RAID rebuild times.

So I emailed GoHardDrives.com and its confirmed that the 5TB are WD Red's and they have WD stock firmware :)

http://www.ebay.com/itm/151631662151?euid=0717f30e7e3d405a9db5a8d0d72712b2&cp=1&exe=13453&ext=34391&sojTags=exe=exe,ext=ext

 

This is one for the books & I am very much on-board with these WL Drives, I cant believe I did not already know about this ;)

Edited by itGeeks
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jmwills

That's a hell of a good price considering the WD labeled drives are about $99 for 3TB

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schoondoggy

So I emailed GoHardDrives.com and its confirmed that the 5TB are WD Red's and they have WD stock firmware :)

http://www.ebay.com/itm/151631662151?euid=0717f30e7e3d405a9db5a8d0d72712b2&cp=1&exe=13453&ext=34391&sojTags=exe=exe,ext=ext

 

This is one for the books & I am very much on-board with these WL Drives, I cant believe I did not already know about this ;)

One point of clarification, the WL drives are generally warranted by the seller, not the OEM. GoHardDrives.com has always been easy to work with on warranty. 

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itGeeks

That's a hell of a good price considering the WD labeled drives are about $99 for 3TB

Yup agreed, I am sold on them even though its only a 1 year warranty

Edited by itGeeks

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itGeeks

Hmm... Thinking more about it, RAID 10 should still be better for 4 drives. A single drive failure in RAID 0+1 would mean both drives in that stripe go down and you're left with 2 drives still working with zero redundancy. A single drive failure in RAID 10 would mean 3 drives are still working and 2 of those drives will be mirrored still.

OK so now we know RAID 6 is better then RAID 5 & RAID 10 is better then RAID 6 for protection and speed but not capacity but we have to remember this is for home use not business so up-time is not going to be as important as it would be for business and most home users don't have the budget that a business would have so again with these little 4-5 bay NAS's I still have to side with RAID 5 for a nice balance in protection & storage space. If this where a business then absolutely I would be using RAID 6 or RAID 10 and I would also be running two of these NAS boxes in a (HA) cluster like I do myself now because I do want 99.9% up-time, My NAS's host many of my family's daily backups so I want to make sure I am online 24/7 for those to take place & we also use these NAS's for our family business so there is a difference here. If my NAS was only used for personal use to store photos, music, movies I would not worry about up-time but rather "backups" both onsite/offsite as in 3-2-1 backup and using at least two different backup programs to get this done. I have an 8 bay NAS but I am only using four bays right now with 6TB Reds and I am running a RAID 5, I have had no trouble with this even rebuilds have been fine but remember I run my NAS in a cluster so if trouble strikes the other box will takeover till I fix the problem. If at some point I add more drives then I will most likely change my RAID level but right now I am in a good place :)

Edited by itGeeks

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pcdoc

Late to this discussion.  I think you have to find a balance with what you are comfortable with.  My suggestion is RAID 5, have a physical spare on hand for quick replacement as that is key, and have an offsite copy.  A month or so ago I had a  6T WD Red go out on me in my QNAP which sports 3 x 6T Red drives in a RAID 5.  I was able to replace it and it rebuilt the array in less than a day as I had a spare with no strain no pain.  Sure if I lost a second drive during that period I would be in trouble hence the need of replacing it quickly having the offsite copy.  Some of you have read my earlier post where I lost numerous Seagate drives in my 18T raid 5 and recovered in hours over the past years.  All the discussions about probability are true but at which point to you stop.  If you have a third copy of "critical" data offsite as we should, and are using a RAID 5, there is no reason to be really concerned unless you plan on taking 3 months to replace the defective drive.  If you are really concerned and your need dictates it, use real time replication to another server.  The thing we must consider is balance.  For maximum use of space and get redundancy you should use RAID 5.  If you have the space to spare in your server/NAS, then choose RAID 6.  If we look at the mathematical probability, it gets real small after RAID 5 which is why it makes the most sense in a home environment where drive slots are limited.  Remember that instead of building the absolute lowest probability of failure, work on building an automatic offsite process which in the end will get the best level of protection.  Just my two cents.

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rotor

I prefer OS-level copies and/or backups. Problems with RAID:

 

- Relies on the controller, so if the controller goes, you have to replace it (and may not be able to, depending on how old it is). Anything proprietary may mean you lose all your data if you can't get an identical controller.

- Doesn't protect you against human error or software/OS level corruption (e.g. Excel crashed just as it was saving the file, and now the file won't open)

- RAID controllers tend to increase the heat (fan noise) and power consumption (££) in a server

- Introduces complexity (a major cause of problems in IT, and the world in general)

 

The *one* place where RAID is essential: HA (high availability). A business that relies on its data being present, benefits from RAID because a drive failure doesn't cause the data to go offline.

 

There's also the matter that RAID is not a backup. If your data is so important that it requires RAID, then surely it also requires backups. So if you need backups, and you aren't a business requiring 100% uptime, then why have RAID in the first place? You're just costing yourself more money.

 

Since we are not businesses (I don't think most of us on this forum are), in my opinion RAID is rarely warranted for home use. Perhaps the one case I can think of, is if a gigantic single volume is required, larger than a single disk can provide, then RAID 10 (4 disks minimum) or RAID 5 (3 disks minimum) would provide that larger volume.

 

My Microserver Gen8 setup is as follows:

 

3TB WD Red (Data)

3TB WD Red (Media)

6TB WD Red (Backups)

 

I use an app called Bvckup2 to replicate everything from the 3TB drives to separate directories on the 6TB drive. These copies happen on a schedule, and keep deleted/modified stuff for a specific amount of time.

I also use CrashPlan to create point in time backups of the most important folders on the Data drive. These backups go to 2 places: the 6TB drive, and CrashPlan online.

 

So I have on-site backups of absolutely everything, and offsite backups of the important stuff.

 

No RAID in sight. =)

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pcdoc

Interesting that we are talking about RAID and failures.  Just lost yet another 6T Red today (having doubts about these drives, worse than Seagates).  At this point, (not that you could before) you can not convince me RAID is not necessary.  The fact I will have a new drive put in 5 minutes, have no down time, and have the redundancy rebuilt by this tomorrow, priceless...

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