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Raid setup for home use - what do you recommend?

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schoondoggy

They are RE Enterprise Drives

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itGeeks

Hi,

 

I will be closing the deal on a new QNAP very soon.  I am thinking about going with a 4 bay unit.  I am moving away from WHS2011.  

 

I have a photos, music, movies, files, etc... on the WHS totaling about 4 TBs of stuff.  I play on using an online backup service - probably crash plan within QNAP for my mission critical stuff.

 

What level of RAID do you recommend for me?

What model QNAP are you getting? I have been using Synology for a while now but I thinking of getting a QNAP for my Daughter. Y did you choose QNAP over Synology?

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itGeeks

I tell you there is something to be learned with tech everyday, I never new about these white label drives. A bit a research on these white label drives told me that these company's change the Firmware to there own? Is that true? And if so I would be a bit concerned as the firmware plays a big role on these drives. What do you think Kevin? In a perfect world I still don't think I would use a 4TB drive in a four bay NAS for "home use" because of the use case of storing large miles, Movies/Pictures/Music along with computer backups take lots of storage and even if you don't think you will ever need more storage in the near future you will somehow outgrow it. With only four bays you have to think dens so bigger is better in my humble opinion, I would go no less then 5TB drives if you store Movies/Pictures/Music with computer backups. I found this 5TB white label for only 10.00 more but its not the RE series its WD Red NAS drive I think. http://www.ebay.com/itm/5TB-64MB-Cache-5700RPM-SATA-III-6-0Gb-s-3-5-Desktop-Hard-Drive-FREE-SHIPPING/151631662151?_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20150604093004%26meid%3D76a5b4c0c25648e5ab4d47150c78dc31%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D4%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D160970197779&rt=nc

 

Kevin what do you think about the 5TB drive I posted above?

Edited by itGeeks
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schoondoggy

I tell you there is something to be learned with tech everyday, I never new about these white label drives. A bit a research on these white label drives told me that these company's change the Firmware to there own? Is that true? And if so I would be a bit concerned as the firmware plays a big role on these drives. What do you think Kevin? In a perfect world I still don't think I would use a 4TB drive in a four bay NAS for "home use" because of the use case of storing large miles, Movies/Pictures/Music along with computer backups take lots of storage and even if you don't think you will ever need more storage in the near future you will somehow outgrow it. With only four bays you have to think dens so bigger is better in my humble opinion, I would go no less then 5TB drives if you store Movies/Pictures/Music with computer backups. I found this 5TB white label for only 10.00 more but its not the RE series its WD Red NAS drive I think. http://www.ebay.com/itm/5TB-64MB-Cache-5700RPM-SATA-III-6-0Gb-s-3-5-Desktop-Hard-Drive-FREE-SHIPPING/151631662151?_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20150604093004%26meid%3D76a5b4c0c25648e5ab4d47150c78dc31%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D4%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D160970197779&rt=nc

 

Kevin what do you think about the 5TB drive I posted above?

White label drives tend to come from OEM's so they could have special firmware or special settings like non-standard sector counts. I have never had an issue with WL drives from GoHardDrives.com. All WL drives I have gotten from them have standard firmware. The 5TB could be a Red or Green. You should email them to see. The only concern I have about bigger drives in NAS boxes relates to RAID rebuild times.

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ShadowPeo

I'm looking at 4x4TB drives and was also thinking RAID5.

 

In that case I would not recommend RAID 5 as on a failure due to the number of sectors you will run into a > 62% chance of their being a URE and loosing all the data as I said in my above post and as the linked reference points out. Therefore I WOULD say RAID6, however as you are only having 4 disks and RAID 6 will loose you 50% of the space anyway. I would go with RAID 10 (1+0, 01, 0+1, pick your reference flavor) as it will have the afore mentioned redundancy, and will have quicker rebuild times, the space "cost" will be the same either way so you arguably should go for the faster rebuild alternative.

 

Just keep in mind if you do chose RAID 5, there are only 2 (or should that be 10) types of people in the world, those who have lost data, and those who will loose data. I recently had an employee at one client have her external HDD go tits-up she thought that because she saved it on there (the drive was called backup) the data was backed up so did not save it in other places, it cost her $2500 to get MOST of it back, and that was a simple recovery not from a RAID set or anything like that.

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GotNoTime

A bit a research on these white label drives told me that these company's change the Firmware to there own? Is that true?

There are two major things that are generally changed.

 

The first is to cap the number of sectors at a specific count for that size drive. This allows them to be interchangable in their storage enclosures. You don't need to get a specific WD HD to replace a failed drive. You'd just buy a Dell 1TB drive and the modified firmware will make it the same. This shouldn't affect other usage of the drives. You just have slightly less capacity.

 

The second is generally only done in very large high end storage arrays like giant EMC or NetApp racks. They change the sector size from 512 to 520 and store ECC data in those extra 8 bytes. Some people have managed to revert them back to 512 byte sectors. A lot of stuff won't like the odd sized sectors so these aren't good for general purpose usage.

 

If the drives have regular 512 or 4096 byte sectors then they should work fine even with other firmware modifications.

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GotNoTime

I would go with RAID 10 (1+0, 01, 0+1, pick your reference flavor)

It doesn't matter for only 4 drives but RAID 10 is much more preferable than RAID 0+1 once you go beyond that 4 drives. Fault tolerance is much less for RAID 0+1 as a single drive failure will mean an entire set of striped drives will become unavailable. For RAID 10 however, you're safe so long as you don't have both drives in a mirrored pair go down.

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awraynor

 

They increased the price to $109 each. I made an offer for $99 x 4 drives. After 24 hrs. still haven't heard back. 

 

For $109 I would pay the extra $10 and get the 5TB, assuming they aren't Greens. Every Green drive I have had has died. 

And we know for sure these are WD drives and not Seagate?

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ShadowPeo

It doesn't matter for only 4 drives but RAID 10 is much more preferable than RAID 0+1 once you go beyond that 4 drives. Fault tolerance is much less for RAID 0+1 as a single drive failure will mean an entire set of striped drives will become unavailable. For RAID 10 however, you're safe so long as you don't have both drives in a mirrored pair go down.

 

Quite right but as he said above, and you pointed out it is 4 drives therefore it is not going to matter much. if it was more than 4 drives I would be going RAID 6 anyway (given the number and capacity of the disks) as it is a better space to redundancy ratio and more than adequate for most things.

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GotNoTime

Quite right but as he said above, and you pointed out it is 4 drives therefore it is not going to matter much. if it was more than 4 drives I would be going RAID 6 anyway (given the number and capacity of the disks) as it is a better space to redundancy ratio and more than adequate for most things.

Hmm... Thinking more about it, RAID 10 should still be better for 4 drives. A single drive failure in RAID 0+1 would mean both drives in that stripe go down and you're left with 2 drives still working with zero redundancy. A single drive failure in RAID 10 would mean 3 drives are still working and 2 of those drives will be mirrored still.
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