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Ready to expirement 10Gb Ethernet?


schoondoggy

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schoondoggy
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Okay, so my experience with 10 GbE:      with Debian Linux on the Microserver and Windows 10 and Ubuntu Linux on desktop Mellanox cards work plug and play  I used the cards to direct-connect my w

You are welcome.  Those are great cards at a great price.  Only I can't get myself to pull the trigger on is the switch.  But for now direct connect is working awesome!

I've had some experience with 10G ethernet. The core at work is 40Gbps and then the aggregation switches have 10Gbps links to the access switches. All of the other links in/out are single or bonded 1Gbps links. All of it is Cisco gear. Forever fighting bizarre IOS bugs :P None of the stuff I've used is really suitable for a lab even beyond the cost issue since they're all akin to tiny jet engines trying to take off. Your lab would have to be in another building far away for noise reasons.

 

For home however, I'm happy with gigabit ethernet for now. I don't have anything that needs 10G or faster ethernet so I'll save upgrading for later.

 

Are those SFP+s compatible with the switch? A lot of stuff has annoying whitelists for specific blessed SFP IDs even though most of them are physically generic ones from somebody like Finisar. Some people make reprogrammable SFPs now where you plug them into a programming box and can set them up to be compatible with any device you want.

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schoondoggy

I've had some experience with 10G ethernet. The core at work is 40Gbps and then the aggregation switches have 10Gbps links to the access switches. All of the other links in/out are single or bonded 1Gbps links. All of it is Cisco gear. Forever fighting bizarre IOS bugs :P None of the stuff I've used is really suitable for a lab even beyond the cost issue since they're all akin to tiny jet engines trying to take off. Your lab would have to be in another building far away for noise reasons.

 

For home however, I'm happy with gigabit ethernet for now. I don't have anything that needs 10G or faster ethernet so I'll save upgrading for later.

 

Are those SFP+s compatible with the switch? A lot of stuff has annoying whitelists for specific blessed SFP IDs even though most of them are physically generic ones from somebody like Finisar. Some people make reprogrammable SFPs now where you plug them into a programming box and can set them up to be compatible with any device you want.

I tend to be an ABC networking guy, Anything But Cisco!

All good points, I don't need 10Gb, but I like to play!

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maybe when the costs come down!

The hardware has been steadily dropping in price. The problem is that you need Cat6a or better cable to run it which means rewiring from scratch..
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schoondoggy

maybe when the costs come down!

Well a GSM7328S V2 just sold for $202 that gives you twenty-four 1GbE and two 10GbE SFP+.

Two SFP+ are $25 each, or $15 if non-Netgear will work.

NIC's are $20

Fiber cable are $5 for 3 Meter or $30 for 50 Meter if you need to go a long way.

 

So for under $300 I could have two servers in my lab running 10GbE.

I know I don't need it. If some folks are running into network issues you could run a server on one 10GbE port and a NAS on the other:

http://www.qnap.com//static/landing/10gbe_en.html 

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I don't do anything higher than teaming two gig connections.

 

As for Cisco, some of their SG300 line of small business switches is really nice, including for home networks, and at a reasonable price considering they are full featured.  And it's lifetime warranty, with no support contracts required for firmware.

 

I wouldn't buy enterprise Cisco gear for home.  Their licensing makes it a pain, and lots of enterprise networking gear is too noisy for home environments anyway.

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I wouldn't buy enterprise Cisco gear for home.  Their licensing makes it a pain, and lots of enterprise networking gear is too noisy for home environments anyway.

I agree. Been there, done that when I was pursuing various Cisco certifications. That is the only reason I'd suggest somebody buy enterprise Cisco equipment. The hardware + licensing + support contracts cost a fortune even after steep discounts from harassing the Cisco salesdroids that visit at work. The performance just wasn't that amazing either since I was looking at the branch office equipment. It only becomes impressive when you're talking about datacenter or enterprise networks with lots of custom Cisco ASICs but you also get a similarly impressive bill for it.

 

Switching out all of the Cisco gear with other brands has meant increased performance and absolute silence due to being fanless whilst being 1/10th the price.

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