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tippet5x

small vlan router

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tippet5x

hello

looking to separate my lab esxi server from family devices.

the esxi will eventually have dns,dhcp, running.

 

from what I understand I need to create a vlan with a switch (looking a layer 2). I was looking at the netgear gs108t or the tp-link tl-sg2008 or the cisco sg200-08 gib smart switch

 

would this work? at this point I was not looking to learn cisco commands to configure one of their devices.

 

thank you

Edited by tippet5x

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nrf

I have only a little to offer here, which is to ask questions - will this vlan also need to access the internet and offer services?

are all your virtual machines on one physical machine where you could have a virtual lan within the physical server and hidden from the lan?

 

in general you get more here by sharing more of your setup and objectives....

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schoondoggy

You could just run another router from your existing network. 

I run two separate networks, one for the family and one for the lab. If you build your own router with Sophos, you just need another Ethernet port for the second network. I first went to separate Lan's when I got my first firewall, ZyWall 20 from ZyXel. The hardware has changed, but the basic network is the same:

http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/6029-your-serversinfrastructure/?p=67149

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tippet5x

sorry

 

I have two esxi servers and a nas device that I would like to unitize for AD and esxi testing. Would be nice to have internet access in the lab setup

my current router is a buffalo ac1750, no dd-wrt. this one is handling out dhcp right now.

 

I do have an addition Netgear router doing nothing right now , but not sure how to incorporate into the setup.

 

thank you

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nrf

in my case I have a cablemodem that will grant internet IP addresses to multiple devices (6?). If your 'modem' can do the same, you could put a switch between the modem and the router, and hang the second router off the switch as well. each router will get its own internet addressable IP.  If you are more the sophos type see above. 

 

sounds like you are about to have some fun!

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nrf

I first went to separate Lan's when I got my first firewall, ZyWall 20 from ZyXel. The hardware has changed, but the basic network is the same:

http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/6029-your-serversinfrastructure/?p=67149

Kevin, nice diagram!  I see you utilize the 'tree of switches' approach, yet I have read that it is better to 'bite the bullet' and wire everything to a single honking centralized switch. Do you have any wisdom you could impart on that issue?

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GotNoTime

I see you utilize the 'tree of switches' approach, yet I have read that it is better to 'bite the bullet' and wire everything to a single honking centralized switch.

For the setup in Schoondoggy's diagram, the various room switches will be bottlenecked by the single links back to the core switch. The devices in each room however, don't look like they'd actually need the full 1Gbps throughput concurrently so actual implications for this bottleneck are going to be minimal. The fix for this and to keep the existing topology would be to buy more expensive switches which have 10G uplink ports + the option of bonding and replace the core switch with one that has multiple 10G ports. The other alternative would be a giant centralised switch but that would involve significant rewiring.

 

Daisy chaining switches is generally not recommended because of this bottlenecking issue, for general tidiness of the network topology and timing issues with protocols due to the additional latency. Spanning tree is not recommended with more than 7 hops for example.

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nrf

I am wondering if such a statement still applies with gigabit speeds. Clearly with 10/100 I could see it as a significant issue.

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schoondoggy

Kevin, nice diagram!  I see you utilize the 'tree of switches' approach, yet I have read that it is better to 'bite the bullet' and wire everything to a single honking centralized switch. Do you have any wisdom you could impart on that issue?

It is best to run everything back to a single core switch, but at the time I put this together I had lots of 5 and 8 port GbE switches and the cable runs were a bit hard to add onto. As we remodel the house I will probably add cables to have runs back to a single core.

 

For the setup in Schoondoggy's diagram, the various room switches will be bottlenecked by the single links back to the core switch. The devices in each room however, don't look like they'd actually need the full 1Gbps throughput concurrently so actual implications for this bottleneck are going to be minimal. The fix for this and to keep the existing topology would be to buy more expensive switches which have 10G uplink ports + the option of bonding and replace the core switch with one that has multiple 10G ports. The other alternative would be a giant centralised switch but that would involve significant rewiring.

 

Daisy chaining switches is generally not recommended because of this bottlenecking issue, for general tidiness of the network topology and timing issues with protocols due to the additional latency. Spanning tree is not recommended with more than 7 hops for example.

Good points, I tend to think of my layout as 'hub and spoke'. Any device to any device on the same network is at most three switches apart. 

Even in the lab environment at work it is easy to accidentally string several switches in a chain.

I have been pricing switches with 10Gb up-links, I see some with twenty four 1Gb ports and two 10Gbe up-links around $350.

 

I am wondering if such a statement still applies with gigabit speeds. Clearly with 10/100 I could see it as a significant issue.

I have not had issues with my design. Generally only one or two devices out on a 'spoke' switch are active at a time. If it was 100Mb it would be an issue or if three to four devices are streaming video back over my 1Gb up-links I will see buffering or shuddering. 

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GotNoTime

I am wondering if such a statement still applies with gigabit speeds. Clearly with 10/100 I could see it as a significant issue.

It is more of an issue in offices which will have large numbers of actively used PCs in each room and where people will daisy chain more switches. You may find several rooms all hanging off a single link back to the core switches.

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