Jump to content
RESET Forums (homeservershow.com)

  • Joe_Miner
    By: JohnStutsman
     
     
     

     
    Figure 1 – HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 on static mat ready for Windows 10 pro x64 install via iLO4
     
     
     

     
    Figure 2 – This shows my Samsung 840 Pro (This will be my OS drive) set up in a single drive RAID0 in the B140i using SSA
     
     
     
    After manually installing Windows Server 2016 easily on HPE’s ProLiant ML30 Gen9 I was anxious to see if an install of Window 10 Pro would be just as trouble free. It was!
     
    Besides having Hyper-V capabilities, Windows 10 Pro, is being looked on by many as the basis of a low cost Home Server as illustrated in “Building a Windows 10 Home Server – Anniversary Update Edition”. Check out HPE’s Operating System Support Matrices for insights on the many OS’s that the ML30 Gen9 supports. But, what will work goes beyond what’s officially supported by HPE in the “Matrices”. Windows 10 Pro is not listed in the Matrices but Windows Server 2016 is and Server 2016 shares much of the code with Windows 10 Pro as does Server 2012R2 shares with Windows 8.1 pro and Server 2012 shares with Windows 8. In order to manually load Windows 10 Pro I downloaded drivers for Server 2016. The simplest procedure, for me, is to use SPP to update all the ML30 Gen9 firmware first, then use the drivers for the B140i to load Windows 10 Pro, then after Windows 10 Pro is loaded and updated use HPSUM to load all the relevant drivers and software into Windows 10 Pro.
     
    Like Server 2016, Windows 10 Pro has its own generic drivers that will work with the ML30 Gen9’s NIC and Video so the B140i drivers is all that’s needed to get Windows 10 Pro onto the ML30 Gen9! HPSUM run (with Administrator Privileges) will load all of the missing HPE drivers I need in one step – including the NIC’s, Video, and SSA – just to name a few.
     
     
     
    Step-By-Step: Windows 10 Pro on HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9
     
    I used iLO4 to remote into the ML30 Gen9 and began to install Windows 10 Pro x64 manually (i.e. without using IP) in the following general steps:
     
    Since I had just recently done steps 1-7 not long ago I skipped to 5 then did 7 through 16 below.
    Download Service Pack for ProLiant (SPP) from Hewlett Packard Enterprise Support Center – Drivers & Software – the current version is 2016.10.0 (24 Oct 2016) – check also threads about SPP at HSS Forum MS Gen8 Load the SPP ISO in “virtual drives” in remote desktop of iLO4 Boot the ML30 Gen9 – with no drives in the ML30 Gen9 in my case – and let SPP run automatically and update all firmware – See Figure 3 below. Shut down the ML30 Gen9 Next: I removed the Samsung 840 Pro 256GB that I had loaded Server 2016 on (giving me the flexibility to switch OS’s by switching SSD’s in the ML30 Gen9) and loaded another Samsung 840 Pro 256GB into drive 1 of the Icy Dock ToughArmor MB994SP-4SB-1 Go to the Hewlett Packard Enterprise Support Center – Drivers & Software – and download the file cp028631.exe that is the Dynamic Smart Array B140i Controller Driver for 64-bit Microsoft Windows Server 2012/2016 Editions (Since Windows 10 has the same core as Server 2016 I plan to use it for manual installation of Windows 10 64-bit Pro in the ML30 Gen9 – the HPE Drivers & Software site does not have Drivers & Software for non-server OS’s) – the current version is 62.12.0.64 (24 Oct 2016) Extract the files in cp028631.exe and load those into a file folder that I then attach/load in “virtual drives” of remote desktop of iLO4 (during Windows install this will be the folder I browse to so that Windows 10 can pull in the driver and see the Samsung 840 Pro ) Load the Windows 10 Pro x64 ISO in “virtual drives” of remote desktop of iLO4 Boot the ML30 Gen9 During boot go into IP (press F10) and select SSA (Smart Storage Administrator) In SSA I set up the Samsung 840 Pro as a single drive RAID0 to be used as my OS drive – See Figure 2 earlier. Exit SSA & IP and Restart the ML30 Gen9 Proceed with the normal Windows 10 Pro x64 install – During install Windows 10 will ask for location of drivers so it can see the drive(s) – in browse lead it to the location to the file folder of B140i driver(s) in the “virtual drives” C: -- if your OS drive had been previously formatted as MBR you will have to delete that so it can be formatted as GPT. See Video 1 below. After Windows 10 is installed and updated – reattach SPP ISO in remote desktop of iLO4 In the Windows desktop go to the SPP ISO in File Explorer and Execute the Batch file for HPSUM (i.e. execute: launch_hpsum.bat as Administrator) – I chose “Localhost Guided Update” – Automatic Mode After running HPSUM (and rebooting) the HPE software shown in Figure 4 below was installed. Enjoy!  
     

     
    Figure 3 – After running SPP’s ISO the firmware of the ML30 Gen9 is up to date.
     
     
     
     
    Video 1 – Browsing to select the file folder with B14i S2016 drivers during install of Windows 10 Pro on HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9
     
     
     

     
    Figure 4 – Software installed by HPSUM in Windows Server 2016
     
     
     

     
    Figure 5 – Temperatures in the ML30 Gen9 via iLO4. BIOS is set on optimal cooling and my single System Fan is running at 6% and the two 40mm fans on the MB994SP-4SB-1 are turned on.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 6 – System information showing Windows 10 Pro as the OS
     
     
     

     
    Figure 7 – Basic information showing Windows Server loaded onto my HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 running from a single SSD RAID0 in bay 1 of the Icy Dock ToughArmor MB994SP-4SB-1
     
     
     
    All in all Windows 10 Pro was easy to load onto the HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 providing a relatively cheaper platform (compared to Windows Server 2016) for a home lab for setting up and testing applications in Hyper-V for instance.
     
    In the As-Built that follows I list how this ML10v2 is loaded. Be sure to check out more on this at ML10 and ML10v2 Forum and Windows 10 Pro on HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 Forum Thread.
     
     
     
    As-Built (I named my Computer: Serenity)
    HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 (Product No. 830893) Xeon E3-1240v5 (SkyLake LGA 1151) 8GB ECC RAM (Expandable to 64GB) OS: Windows 10 Pro B140i Dynamic Smart Array: Ports 1-4: (4*3.5” Drive Tray Caddies for Main Drive-Cage Assembly Bays 1-4) B140i Dynamic Smart Array: Ports 5-6: Icy Dock MB994SP-4SB-1 in Top 5.25” half-height Bay; with/ 2*18” SATA III (6 Gb/s) cables attached to Bays 1 & 2 (Bays 3 & 4 are available for future); Molex to Molex & Fan Y-Connector Cable; Samsung 840 Pro 256GB in Bay 1;  
     
    Please join us in the HomeServerShow Forums to discuss this and tell us what you are building at home.
     
     
     
    References:
     
    Check HSS Forum Post: Other HSS ML30 Blog Postings: http://homeservershow.com/tag/ML30
     
     HSS HP ProLiant ML30 Forum postings (In HSS Forum ML10 & ML10v2): http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/forum/98-ml10-and-ml10v2/
     
    HP MicroServer Gen8 – Service Pack for ProLiant – 24th Oct 2016 http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/12034-hp-microserver-gen8-service-pack-for-proliant-24th-oct-2016/
     
     iLO Advanced License Keys http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/9511-ilo-advanced-license-keys-1850-2400/
     
     Icy Dock “ToughArmor” MB994SP-4SB-1 http://www.icydock.com/goods.php?id=142
     
    Scsi4me.com 3.5” Drive Tray Caddy 4 HP ProLiant ML350e ML310e SL250s Gen8 Gen9 G9 651314-001 http://www.ebay.com/itm/231001449171
     
     HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 Server QuickSpecs http://h20195.www2.hp.com/v2/GetDocument.aspx?docname=c04834998&doctype=quickspecs&doclang=EN_US&searchquery=&cc=us&lc=en
     
    HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 Server “Maintenance and Service Guide”; Part Number: 825545-002; November 2016; Edition: 2 => http://h20565.www2.hpe.com/hpsc/doc/public/display?sp4ts.oid=1008556812&docLocale=en_US&docId=emr_na-c04905980 Or go to => http://h20565.www2.hpe.com/portal/site/hpsc/public/psi/home/?sp4ts.oid=1008556812&ac.admitted=1489520211680.125225703.1851288163#manuals
     
     Check out my HPE ML30 Gen9 Play-List:

    Joe_Miner
    (And Install Windows Server 2016 in HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9)
     
    By: JohnStutsman
     
     
     

     
    Figure 1 – HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 with Tower Bezel Assembly removed and both EMI shield’s removed. MB994SP-4SB-1 rests in static mat in front.
     
     
     
    After finishing up work on my ML10v2 I wanted to move back to the HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 and begin testing to eventually configure it as a workhorse in my home lab. First I wanted a way to be able to easily add 2.5” drives (from thin SSD’s but including up to the 15mm VelociRaptor’s – what’s a home lab without VelociRaptor’s I always say J). The ML30 Gen 9 (Product No. 830893) has 6 SATA III (6Gb/s) ports with 4 (ports 1 -4) to the LFF hot-swap cage via a mini-SAS cable from the System Board and ports 5 & 6 available as SATA III (6Gb/s) on the System Board all controlled by the embedded B140i on the system board. While I only had 2 extra SATA ports I also wanted some future expandability if I decided to move to an add-on controller card. I felt that the Icy Dock 4-in-1 ToughArmor MB994SP-4SB-1 would best fit my “want’s”.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 2 – Front view of Icy Dock ToughArmor MB994SP-4SB-1, fits in an external half height 5.25” bay holding 4 x 2.5” SATA III (6Gb/s) SSD’s or HDD’s up to 15mm high with hot swap capability. Each drive bay has LED indication of drive power (green) & activity (amber)
     
     
     

     
    Figure 3– View of Icy Dock ToughArmor MB994SP-4SB-1 with the 4 x 2.5” SATA III (6Gb/s) hot-swap drive trays extended. Note that they are all metal construction with a very solid feel. Also note the anti-vibration design.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 4 – Bottom view of a single 2.5” SATA III (6Gb/s) hot-swap drive tray for the Icy Dock ToughArmor MB994SP-4SB-1. Each drive can be secured with 4 screws (supplied by Icy Dock) making for a very solid configuration.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 5 – Rear view of the Icy Dock ToughArmor MB994SP-4SB-1. Each drive has its own SATA III (6 Gb/s) port. The power is supplied via the Molex connector on the lower left and the two 40mm fans are controlled by the on/off switch above the Power Connector. I would certainly want the fans “on” if I fill the ToughArmor with 15mm high VelociRaptors to keep my “Raptors” cool but even if I fill the ToughArmor with SSD’s I plan to have the fans “on” to provide more air circulation inside the ML30 Gen9. Currently, I’m planning to only connect SATA Ports 1 & 2 and save 3 & 4 for future expansion. SATA Ports 1 & 2 will be connected to SATA III (6 Gb/s) Ports 5 & 6 located on the ML30 Gen9 System Board.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 6 – This specification chart I copied from Icy Dock’s web page for the ToughArmor MB994SP-4SB-1 The major item missing from this chart is that each drive tray will accommodate 2.5” drives up to 15mm thick. 15mm is the thickness of a VelociRaptor without its cool pack for 3.5” drive spaces. The “Data Sheet” for the MB994SP-4SB-1 in Figure 7 below does reference the drive height that the drive tray will accommodate.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 7 – Icy Dock’s “Data Sheet” that I downloaded from their web page for the ToughArmor MB994SP-4SB-1.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 8 – HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 with Tower Bezel Assembly removed and both EMI shield’s removed. MB994SP-4SB-1 rests on static mat in front. The two 18 SATA III cables that I attached to SATA III Ports 5 & 6 on the System Board extend out of the front of the ML30 Gen9 case.
     
     
     
    Video of installation of the MB994SP-4SB-1.
     

     
    Video 1 – Install MB994SP-4SB-1 in HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9
     
     
     
    Updating Firmware, installing Windows Server 2016, Updating Drivers
     
    After the installation of the ToughArmor MB994SP-4SB-1 I used iLO4 to remote into my ML30 Gen9 and began to install Windows Server 2016 manually (i.e. without using IP) in the following general steps:


    Download Service Pack for ProLiant (SPP) from Hewlett Packard Enterprise Support Center – Drivers & Software – the current version is 2016.10.0 (24 Oct 2016) – check also threads about SPP at HSS Forum MS Gen8
    Load the SPP ISO in remote desktop of iLO4
    Boot the ML30 Gen9 – with no drives in the ML30 Gen9 in my case – and let SPP run automatically and update all firmware
    Shut down the ML30 Gen9
     
     

     
    Figure 9 – After running SPP’s ISO the firmware of the ML30 Gen9 is up to date.
     
     


    Next: I loaded the Samsung 840 Pro 256GB into drive 1 of the Icy Dock ToughArmor MB994SP-4SB-1
    Go to the Hewlett Packard Enterprise Support Center – Drivers & Software – and download the file cp028631.exe that is the Dynamic Smart Array B140i Controller Driver for 64-bit Microsoft Windows Server 2012/2016 Editions (This is the same driver I plan to use for a manual installation of Windows 10 64-bit Pro sometime later in the ML30 Gen9) – the current version is 62.12.0.64 (24 Oct 2016)
    Extract the files in cp028631.exe and load those into a file folder that I then attach/load in remote desktop of iLO4 (during Windows install this will be the folder I browse to so that Windows can pull in the driver and see the Samsung 840 Pro)
    Load the Windows Server 2016 ISO in remote desktop of iLO4
    Boot the ML30 Gen9
    During boot go into IP and select SSA (Smart Storage Administrator)
    In SSA I set up the Samsung 840 Pro as a single drive RAID0 to be used as my OS drive
    Exit SSA & IP and Restart the ML30 Gen9
    Proceed with the normal Windows install
    After Windows is installed and updated – reattach SPP ISO in remote desktop of iLO4
    In the Windows desktop go to the SPP ISO in File Explorer and Execute the Batch file for HPSUM – I chose the automatic update
    After running HPSUM (and rebooting) the HPE software shown in Figure 10 below was installed. Enjoy!
     
     

     
    Figure 10 – Software installed by HPSUM in Windows Server 2016
     
     
     

     
    Figure 11 – This shows my Samsung 840 Pro (my OS drive) set up in a single drive RAID0 in the B140i using SSA
     
     
     

     
    Figure 12 – Temperatures in the ML30 Gen9 via iLO4. BIOS is set on optimal cooling and my single System Fan is running at 6% and the two 40mm fans on the MB994SP-4SB-1 are turned on.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 13 – Basic information showing Windows Server loaded onto my HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 running from a single SSD RAID0 in bay 1 of the Icy Dock ToughArmor MB994SP-4SB-1
     
     
     

     
    Figure 14 – Icy Dock MB994SP-4SB-1 ToughArmor installed in the HPE ProLiant ML30Gen9
     
     
     
    I really like the MB994SP-4SB-1 in the ML30 Gen9 and the installation of Windows Server 2016 while updating the firmware and drivers with SPP and HPSUM was relatively trouble free.
     
    In the As-Built that follows I list how this ML30 Gen9 is loaded. Be sure to check out more on this at ML10 and ML10v2 Forum and Icy Dock MB994SP-4SB-1 ToughArmor in HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9.
     
     
     
    As-Built (I named my Computer: Serenity)


    HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 (Product No. 830893)
    Xeon E3-1240v5 (SkyLake LGA 1151)
    8GB ECC RAM (Expandable to 64GB)
    OS: Windows Server 2016 – Logical Drive 01 (Samsung 840 Pro 256GB – RAID0 B140i Dynamic Smart Array
    B140i Dynamic Smart Array (4*3.5” Drive Tray Caddies for Main Drive-Cage Assembly)
    Icy Dock MB994SP-4SB-1; with/ 2*18” SATA III (6 Gb/s) cables attached to Bays 1 & 2; Molex to Molex & Fan Y-Connector Cable; Samsung 840 Pro 256GB in Bay 1;
     
     
    Please join us in the HomeServerShow Forums to discuss this and many other interesting topics.
     
     
     
    References:
     
    Check HSS Forum Post: Other HSS ML30 Blog Postings: http://homeservershow.com/tag/ML30
     
    HSS HP ProLiant ML30 Forum postings (In HSS Forum ML10 & ML10v2): http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/forum/98-ml10-and-ml10v2/
     
    HP MicroServer Gen8 – Service Pack for ProLiant – 24th Oct 2016 http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/12034-hp-microserver-gen8-service-pack-for-proliant-24th-oct-2016/
     
    Icy Dock “ToughArmor” MB994SP-4SB-1 http://www.icydock.com/goods.php?id=142
     
    Scsi4me.com 3.5” Drive Tray Caddy 4 HP ProLiant ML350e ML310e SL250s Gen8 Gen9 G9 651314-001 http://www.ebay.com/itm/231001449171
     
    HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 Server QuickSpecs http://h20195.www2.hp.com/v2/GetDocument.aspx?docname=c04834998&doctype=quickspecs&doclang=EN_US&searchquery=&cc=us&lc=en
     
    HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 Server “Maintenance and Service Guide”; Part Number: 825545-002; November 2016; Edition: 2 => http://h20565.www2.hpe.com/hpsc/doc/public/display?sp4ts.oid=1008556812&docLocale=en_US&docId=emr_na-c04905980 Or go to => http://h20565.www2.hpe.com/portal/site/hpsc/public/psi/home/?sp4ts.oid=1008556812&ac.admitted=1489520211680.125225703.1851288163#manuals
     
    Check out my HPE ML30 Gen9 Play-List:

    Joe_Miner
    By: JohnStutsman
     
     
     

     
    Figure 1 – The Calhoun Technologies HP 686745-002 “Refurbished” drive-cage in anti-static package with Dell 15” mini SAS cable resting on top with other drive-cages and HPE ProLiant ML10v2 Server
     
     
     
    A year ago when I was planning my move to Ohio I wanted to move my 5TB drives from my HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 to my HPE ProLiant ML10v2 in order to set up a “Mirror” backup of the files on my WHS2011 system using AllWay Sync on my ML10v2. The fastest way to make the move was to unplug the drive-cage in the ML30 Gen9 and plug it into the ML10v2! It fit perfectly and worked flawlessly. It also spoiled me!
     
    After settling in Ohio, finally, I wanted to return the ML30 Gen9’s drive-cage to its rightful place and I began searching for the best low-cost way to add a drive-cage to my ML10v2 that worked like the one in the ML30 Gen9 instead of the stock ML10v2 drive-cage. There’s a great discussion in the HSS Forums documenting forum members search for a similar drive-cage.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 2 – Pages 18 & 19 of HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 Server “Maintenance and Service Guide”; Part Number: 825545-001; December 2015; Edition 1; shows a spare part number 792351-001 for the Four-bay LFF Hot-plug drive backplane assembly which would include the a) Drive backplane and Drive cage – Part 792351-001 is the part I first looked for and found at Calhoun Technologies.
     
     
     
    After reading some great suggestions in the Forums I stumbled upon the 792351-001 in the parts number of the ML30 Gen9 manual and thought it should fit the bill and found a low-cost option at Calhoun Technologies for a 792351-001 “Refurbished”.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 3 – ML30Gen9 drive-cage (also 686745-002 footprint) compared to 792351-001 on bottom – the sharpie markings show how much wider the front of the 792351-001 frame is compared to the 686745-002 and why the front cover of the ML10v2 wouldn’t close on the 792351-001.
     
     
     
    The 792351-001 did work in my ML10v2 but I could not close the front cover on the ML10v2, so I kept looking while also trying to modify the 792351 with my Dremel. I could make it fit finally, but only after a lot of Dremel work and the end result didn’t look good.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 4 – Tag identifying the drive-cage assembly in ML30G9 as: HPE P/N 674790-002 Replace with spare HDD Cage, 4Lff, $u Gen8 Enhanced (686745-002) LITEON (Rev. 15-11-17. The 686745-002 that arrived was identified with a similar tag: HP P/N 674790-002 Replace with spare HDD Cage, 4LFF, 4U Gen8 Enhanced (686745-002) LITEON (Rev.A) 14-03-17.
     
     
     
    On the drive-cage out of the ML30 Gen9 I found the part number 686745-002 which I thought was the part number of the cage alone. (I was wrong about that!) I found it at Calhoun Technologies listed as HP 686745-002 “Refurbished” SPS-HDD cage 4LFF 4U Enhanced. Thinking that it was likely only the drive-cage without a backplane I ordered it since with the 792351-001 I had an extra backplane. I was wrong! The part number referred to the assembly of the drive-cage and backplane.
     
    As the following pictures will show the 686745-002 arrived with a backplane and it appears to be working flawlessly.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 5 – Front and Back of Calhoun Technologies HP 686745-002 “Refurbished” SPS-HDD cage 4LFF 4U Enhanced
     
     
     

     
    Figure 6 – Picture of backplanes L-R: ML30G9 Drive-Cage, 792351-001, and 686745-002
     
     
     
    Video of my installation of the 686745-002.
     
     
     
     
    Video 1 – Install Drive-Cage in HPE ProLiant ML10v2
     
     
     

     
    Figure 7 – Calhoun Technologies HP 686745-002 “Refurbished” SPS-HDD cage 4LFF 4U Enhanced installed in HPE ProLiant ML10v2
     
     
     

     
    Figure 8 – HPE ProLiant ML10v2 powered up and all 3.5” drives functioning in Calhoun Technologies HP 686745-002 “Refurbished” SPS-HDD cage 4LFF 4U Enhanced
     
     
     
    Thanks to the members of HSS Forum Thread: ML10v2 Drive-Cage for their many insights and suggestions and thanks to forum member ToyCeli22 for starting the thread.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 9 – 686745-002 drive-cage installed in ML10v2 on left and stock 674790-002 drive-cage back in the ML30Gen9 on right
     
     
     
    In the As-Built that follows I list how this ML10v2 is loaded. Be sure to check out more on this at ML10 and ML10v2 Forum and ML10v2 Drive Cage Forum Thread.
     
     
     
    As-Built (I named my Computer: SkyNet)
    HPE ProLiant ML10v2 Server Xeon E3-1220v3 32GB Unbuffered ECC RAM KVR16E11K4/32 OS: Windows 8.1 Pro B120i Logical Drive 01: OS drive – 1 x Corsair Force GT 240GB SSD in RAID0 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – Port 1 (SATA III or 6GB/s) -- Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B Bay 1 B120i Logical Drive 02: Data drive – 1 x Samsung 256GB 840 Pro SSD in RAID0 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – Port 2 (SATA III or 6GB/s) – Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B Bay 2 B120i Logical Drive 03: Data drive -- 4 x WD10JUCT 1TB 2.5” HDDs in RAID10 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – Ports 3, 4, 5, & 6 (each SATA II or 3GB/s) – Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B Bays 3, 4, 5, & 6 P222 Logical Drive 01: Data drive – 4 x WD 5TB SE HDDs (WD5001F9YZ) in RAID5 on HP Dynamic Smart Array P222 RAID Controller Card – Ports 1, 2, 3, & 4 (each SATA III or 6GB/s) – mounted in Bays 1, 2, 3, & 4 of drive-cage 686745-002 “Refurbished” Calhoun Technologies Drive-cage 686745-002 “Refurbished” SPS-HDD cage 4LFF 4U Enhanced; Dell Poweredge T710 PG9KK Mini SAS SFF-8087 cable 15” (38cm) Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B (I used the existing SATA cable that had gone to the optical drive for bay 5 plus a Blue 18” SATA cable I had in stock from previous projects for Bay 6; StarTech Model SAS8087S450 19” (50cm) Serial Attached SCSI SAS Cable – SFF-8087 to 4x Latching SATA for Bays 1, 2, 3, & 4; I also used a Molex Y to two SATA Power Connectors) 60mm Fan mounted near the bottom front of ML10v2 to increase air flow for the P222 60mm Fan mounted in empty card slot to direct air flow directly on P222 heat sink (plus Molex to Fan splitter and Y Fan to 2 Fan connector cable)  
     
     Please join us in the HSS Forums to discuss this and many other interesting topics.
     
     
     
    References:
     
    Check HSS Forum Post: http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/10796-ml10v2-drive-cage/
     
    Scsi4me.com 3.5” Drive Tray Caddy 4 HP ProLiant ML350e ML310e SL250s Gen8 Gen9 G9 651314-001 http://www.ebay.com/itm/231001449171
     
    Dell Poweredge T710 PG9KK Mini SAS SFF-8087 to SFF-8087 Cable 15” (38cm) https://www.amazon.com/Dell-Poweredge-PG9KK-SFF-8087-Cable/dp/B00NOEY3OS/ref=pd_sim_147_9?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=1ZRF07DQQ5V1M36D045C
     
     HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 Server; Maintenance and Service Guide (Item 18 on pages 18-19 lists a Spare part number 792351-001 Four-bay LFF Hot-plug drive backplane assembly – this was where I initially got part number 792351-001 that I ordered from Calhoun Technologies – as stated earlier I found that it did work but I was unable to close the front cover of the ML10v2 or ML30G9 when that part was installed) http://h20628.www2.hp.com/km-ext/kmcsdirect/emr_na-c04905980-1.pdf
     
    Calhoun Technologies HP 686745-002 Refurbished http://www.calhountech.com/products/hp-686745-002-4-bay-sas-sata-lff-hot-plug-drv-cage.html
     
    Additional Fans in the HPE ProLiant ML10v2 http://homeservershow.com/additional-fans-in-the-hpe-proliant-ml10v2.html
     
    Installing Icy Dock 5.25” ExpressCage MB326SP-B http://homeservershow.com/installing-my-icy-dock-5-25-expresscage-mb326sp-b.html  
     
    Other HSS ML10v2 Blog Postings: http://homeservershow.com/tag/ML10v2
     
    HSS HP ProLiant ML10v2 postings: http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/forum/98-ml10-and-ml10v2/
     
    Check out my ML10v2 Play List:
     
    Unboxing Drive Caddies for my ML30 G9
     
     

    Joe_Miner

    Additional Fans in the HPE ProLiant ML10v2

    By Joe_Miner, in Review,

    By: JohnStutsman
     
     
     

     
    Figure 1 – The side and air baffle is removed to show the location of the two additional 60mm fans I located in the bottom section of the HPE ProLiant ML10v2 Server
     
     
     
    When I added a P222 and a video card to my HPE ProLiant ML10v2 Server I was concerned about some temperature readings via iLO4 that exceeded 60C. I wanted to bring that below 60C if possible so I added two 60mm fans using cable ties, blue electrical tape, a Molex to fan power splitter, and a Y fan cable extender/splitter. It was a relative simple job to add these fan: 1) attached to the bottom of the inside frame near the front of the ML10v2 below the main drive cage (area where the Front PCI fan would be located) and 2) attached to lowest PCIe slot cover with cable ties though ventilation holes in the PCIe slot cover.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 2 – The parts I used to install the two 60mm fans in the HPE ProLiant ML10v2
     
     
     
    After the blog posting http://homeservershow.com/installing-my-icy-dock-5-25-expresscage-mb326sp-b.html I had received a few questions on how I located and installed my two 60mm fans in the HPE ProLiant ML10v2.  I thought it would be helpful to take a video and pictures of how I located the additional fans in the HPE ProLiant ML10v2.
     
     
     

     
    Video 1 – Additional Fans in my ML10v2
     
     
     

     
    Figure 3 – 60mm fan attached to the bottom of the inside frame with three small cable ties near the front of the ML10v2 below the main drive cage (area where the Front PCI fan would be located)
     
     
     

     
    Figure 4 – 60mm fan attached to lowest PCIe slot cover with two cable ties though ventilation holes in the PCIe slot cover
     
     
     

     
    Figure 5 – Another view of 60mm fan attached to lowest PCIe slot cover with two cable ties though ventilation holes in the PCIe slot cover
     
     
     

     
    Figure 6 – Outside case view of 60mm fan attached to lowest PCIe slot cover with two cable ties though ventilation holes in the PCIe slot cover
     
     
     

     
    Figure 7 – View showing both 60mm fans attached – fan on left is blowing UP towards the P222 and video card – fan on right is blowing LEFT into box towards PCIe cards
     
     
     

     
    Figure 8 – Temperature distribution inside the ML10v2 via iLO4. The system fan in BIOS is set to Increased Cooling and the system fan speed was 19% at the time of this reading. Note that in addition to the extra 60mm auxiliary fans located inside the HPE ProLiant ML10v2 the ExpressCage MB326SP-B fans were set on high
     
     
     
    In the As-Built that follows I list how this ML10v2 is loaded. Be sure to check out more on this at http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/12114-icy-dock-expresscage-mb326sp-b/ and especially the post http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/12114-icy-dock-expresscage-mb326sp-b/?p=124790 .
     
     
     
    As-Built (I named my Computer: SkyNet)


    HP ProLiant ML10v2 Gen9
    Xeon E3-1220v3
    32GB Unbuffered ECC RAM KVR16E11K4/32
    B120i Logical Drive 01: OS drive – 1 x Corsair Force GT 240GB SSD in RAID0 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – Port 1 (SATA III or 6GB/s) -- Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B Bay 1
    OS: Windows 8.1 Pro
    B120i Logical Drive 02: Data drive – 1 x Samsung 256GB 840 Pro SSD in RAID0 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – Port 2 (SATA III or 6GB/s) – Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B Bay 2
    B120i Logical Drive 03: Data drive -- 4 x WD10JUCT 1TB 2.5” HDDs in RAID10 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – Ports 3, 4, 5, & 6 (each SATA II or 3GB/s) – Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B Bays 3, 4, 5, & 6
    P222 Logical Drive 01: Data drive – 4 x WD 5TB SE HDDs (WD5001F9YZ) in RAID5 on HP Dynamic Smart Array P222 RAID Controller Card – Ports 1, 2, 3, & 4 (each SATA III or 6GB/s) – mounted in Bays 1, 2, 3, & 4 of drive main cage
    Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B (I used the existing SATA cable that had gone to the optical drive for bay 5 plus a Blue 18” SATA cable I had in stock from previous projects for Bay 6; StarTech Model SAS8087S450 19” (50cm) Serial Attached SCSI SAS Cable – SFF-8087 to 4x Latching SATA for Bays 1, 2, 3, & 4; I also used a Molex Y to two SATA Power Connectors)
    Video card – HD5450
    60mm Fan mounted near the bottom front of ML10v2 to increase air flow for the P222 and Video card
    60mm Fan mounted in empty card slot to direct air flow directly on P222 heat sink (plus Molex to Fan splitter and Y Fan to 2 Fan connector cable)
     
     
    Please join us in the HSS Forums to discuss this and your solutions for additional cooling inside servers as well as other interesting tech topics.
     
     
     
    References:
     
    Check out how this ML10v2 is loaded up in “Performance with my Icy Dock 5.25” ExpressCage MB326SP-B” http://homeservershow.com/performance-with-my-icy-dock-5-25-expresscage-mb326sp-b.html
     
    Other HSS ML10v2 Blog Postings: http://homeservershow.com/tag/ML10v2
     
    HSS HP ProLiant ML10v2 postings: http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/forum/98-ml10-and-ml10v2/

    Joe_Miner

    Replacing the Screen on Lumia 1020

    By Joe_Miner, in Review,

    By: JohnStutsman
     
     
     

     
    Figure 1 – Nokia Lumia 1020 with broken display screen
     
     
     
    This is a review of my experience with a FixEZ.com display screen repair/replacement kit.
     
    Recently, one of our Nokia Lumia 1020’s display screen was severely damaged. Dave has said in RESET that later in 2017 some major hardware would be coming out for cell phones so I didn’t want to replace our trusted 1020’s until later in the year when I had a chance to check out the new hardware.
     
    I found a kit available on-line from FixEZ.com to replace the “Nokia Lumia 1020 Display Assembly with Frame” at $67.50 so I ordered.   FixEZ also had a Nokia Lumia 1020 Display Assembly for $54.99 but I felt the Display Assembly with Frame was worth the extra cost by freeing me of the effort to separate my broken Display from the existing frame for reuse. FixEZ.com also has a wide assortment of supplies and I decided to also order their “Nylon Spudger” and their “Fine Tip Curved Tweezers”. A “Plastic Triangle Opening Tool” was included with the kit. I already had other materials that I needed.
     
    I was very impressed with FixEZ’s customer service, I ordered the kit on a Thursday afternoon and it was shipped shortly after my order. The kit arrived at my house two days later on Saturday and I did the replacement on Sunday.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 2 – Broken Lumia 1020 with repair kit from FixEZ.com (in box) while FixEZ’s video is displayed on my Surface and copies of FixEZ’s “Disassemble Guide” surround – all on an anti-static mat.
     
     
     

     
    Video 1 – Replacing the Screen on Lumia 1020
     
     
     

     
    Figure 3 – The repaired Nokia Lumia 1020 next to the old broken screen (face down) and frame
     
     
     

     
    Figure 4 – The repaired Nokia Lumia 1020 next to the old broken screen
     
     
     
    Bottom line: the repaired Lumia 1020 looks & works like new. I had a very good experience with FixEZ.com’s Nokia Lumia 1020 Display Assembly repair kit that was leveraged with great customer service and very useful Screen Repair & Disassemble video and Disassemble Guide. FixEZ.com has a variety of parts and tools to repair many different devices.
     
    Please join us in the HSS Forums to discuss many interesting tech topics.
     
     
     
    References:
     
    Check FixEZ’s page at: https://www.fixez.com/store/nokia/nokia-lumia-1020/nokia-lumia-1020-display-assembly-frame
     
    HSS Forum Posting on this Lumia 1020: http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/12147-windows-phone/
     
    HSS Forum on Phones & Tablets http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/forum/26-phones-tablets-etc/
     
    “Phones and Tablets” PlayList:

    Joe_Miner
    By: JohnStutsman
     
     
     

     
    Figure 1 – Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B – 6 Bay 2.5” SAS/SATA HDD Hot Swap Cage installed in the lower 5.25” Bay of my HP ProLiant ML10v2
     
     
     
    This is Part 3 of a three part series on the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B 6 Bay 2.5” SAS/SATA Hot Swap Cage for 5.25” Bay’s. In this part I measured the performance of my HP ProLiant ML10v2 Server with the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B in the lower (of two) 5.25” bay.
     
    Part 1: Unboxing
     
    Part 2: Installation
     
    Part 3: Performance
     
     
     
    Performance
     
    As stated in Part 1: Recently, Dave asked me to review the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B 6 Bay 2.5” SAS/SATA Hot Swap Cage for 5.25” Bay’s (“ExpressCage”). I had the perfect application in my HP ProLiant ML10v2 where the addition of a P222 I had 10 SATA Ports but only a main cage for four 3.5” drives and two 5.25” Bay’s. With the MB326SP-B I could put six drives in the Icy Dock ExpressCage using one 5.25” bay and still have a 5.25” bay available for future expansion or projects (a huge plus in my book). ExpressCage holds 6 drives (2 SSDs and 4 HDDs in my use case) that are the basis of three logical drives in the B120i embedded on the ML10v2’s system board.
     
    The Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B had many “Key Features” that I found very intriguing but obviously the most important in my mind was being able to install six 2.5” HDDs/SSDs up to 9.5mm thick in the space of one 5.25” half-height bay with hot-swap support and SAS/SATA – 6GB/s support. The additional features were certainly icing on the cake, especially when coupled with my positive experience with other Icy Dock products.
     
    In my opinion, this ExpressCage is living up to its predecessor’s reputations. Its feel is solid and installation was easy. This is a reliable quality product perfect for many applications of the home enthusiast!
     
     
     

     
    Figure 2 – Key Features of the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B (Photo courtesy Icy Dock)
     
     
     

     
    Figure 3 – Storage information for the ML10v2 via iLO4 showing 10 physical drives supporting 3 logical drives on the B120i and 1 logical drive on the P222.
     
     
     
    As shown in Figure 3, above, the 10 physical drives in my ML10v2 support 4 logical drives.
     
    Three logical drives are driven by the B120i HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID controller embedded on the system board of the HP ProLiant ML10v2. These three logical drives are made up from the 6 physical drives mounted in the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B.
     
    The performance of these three logical drives, illustrated in Figures 4, 5, and 6 below, conforms with what I’ve seen in the past with these drives and assures me that the SATA interface of the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B is transparent to the SATA signal from the B120i (i.e. I could not detect any speed degradation). All six bays of the ExpressCage MB326SP-B are rated SATA III or 6GB/s by Icy Dock but of course the transfer rates are dependent of the rated speeds of the Ports from the ML10v2 controller board where SATA Ports 1 & 2 are rated at SATA III or 6GB/s while SATA Ports 3-6 are rated at SATA II or 3GB/s.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 4 – Performance measured with ATTO, CrystalDiskMark, and HD Tune Pro for B120i Logical Drive 01: OS drive – 1 x Corsair Force GT 240GB SSD in RAID0 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – Port 1 (SATA III or 6GB/s) -- Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B Bay 1 (rated SATA III or 6GB/s)
     
     
     

     
    Figure 5 – Performance measured with ATTO, CrystalDiskMark, and HD Tune Pro for B120i Logical Drive 02: Data drive – 1 x Samsung 256GB 840 Pro SSD in RAID0 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – Port 2 (SATA III or 6GB/s) – Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B Bay 2 (rated SATA III or 6GB/s)
     
     
     

     
    Figure 6 – Performance measured with ATTO, CrystalDiskMark, and HD Tune Pro for B120i Logical Drive 03: Data drive -- 4 x WD10JUCT 1TB 2.5” HDDs in RAID10 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – Ports 3, 4, 5, & 6 (each SATA II or 3GB/s) – Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B Bays 3, 4, 5, & 6 (each rated SATA III or 6GB/s)
     
     
     
    The fourth logical drive in my HP ProLiant ML10v2 is driven by the HP P222 Dynamic Smart Array RAID controller in card slot 3 of the ML10v2 as shown in Figure 3 earlier. The P222’s logical drive 01 performance is illustrated in Figure 7 below. The performance of this logical drive wouldn’t have been impacted by the installation of the ExpressCage MB326SP-B (except “possibly” temperature loading inside the ML10v2) but I included it in this report to serve as a complete assessment of my “As-Built” ML10v2.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 7 – Performance measured with ATTO, CrystalDiskMark, and HD Tune Pro for P222 Logical Drive 01: Data drive – 4 x WD 5TB SE HDDs (WD5001F9YZ) in RAID5 on HP Dynamic Smart Array P222 RAID Controller Card – Ports 1, 2, 3, & 4 (each SATA III or 6GB/s) – mounted in Bays 1, 2, 3, & 4 of drive main cage
     
     
     

     
    Figure 8 – Temperature distribution inside the ML10v2 via iLO4. The system fan in BIOS is set to Optimal Cooling and the system fan speed was 6% at the time of this reading. Note that the ExpressCage MB326SP-B fans were set on high and I have two additional 60mm auxiliary fans located inside the ML10v2
     
     
     

     
    Figure 9 – Temperature distribution inside the ML10v2 via iLO4. The system fan in BIOS is set to Increased Cooling and the system fan speed was 19% at the time of this reading. Note that the ExpressCage MB326SP-B fans were set on high and I have two additional 60mm auxiliary fans located inside the ML10v2
     
     
     

     
    Figure 10 – Comparison of the Temperature distributions inside the ML10v2 via iLO4 displayed in Figure 8 on the left (BIOS system fan setting Optimal Cooling & speed was at 6%) and displayed in Figure 9 on the right (BIOS system fan setting Optimal Cooling & speed was at 19%). Important to note that the Inlet Ambient temp was 2C cooler in the second scenario.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 11 – Firmware Version Information in the ML10v2 via iLO4
     
     
     

     
    Figure 12 – Top view of the back of the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B with all SATA data and SATA power connections before inserting into the bottom 5.25” bay of the ML10v2
     
     
     
     
     

     
    Figure 13 – Front view of the HP ProLiant ML10v2 with the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B installed and fully populated plus the Main drive cage is fully populated and all 10 physical drives are active – power draw with the monitor is approximately 120-130W & without the monitor it’s approximately 95-105W.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 14 – Front view of the HP ProLiant ML10v2 with the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B installed in the lower 5.25” bay. Booted up to desktop view. Note Windows Home Server 2011 connector in upper left of the screen File Explorer opened showing the four logical drives in the ML10v2.
     
     
     
    As-Built (I named my Computer: SkyNet)


    HP ProLiant ML10v2 Gen9
    Xeon E3-1220v3
    32GB Unbuffered ECC RAM KVR16E11K4/32
    B120i Logical Drive 01: OS drive – 1 x Corsair Force GT 240GB SSD in RAID0 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – Port 1 (SATA III or 6GB/s) -- Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B Bay 1
    OS: Windows 8.1 Pro
    B120i Logical Drive 02: Data drive – 1 x Samsung 256GB 840 Pro SSD in RAID0 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – Port 2 (SATA III or 6GB/s) – Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B Bay 2
    B120i Logical Drive 03: Data drive -- 4 x WD10JUCT 1TB 2.5” HDDs in RAID10 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – Ports 3, 4, 5, & 6 (each SATA II or 3GB/s) – Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B Bays 3, 4, 5, & 6
    P222 Logical Drive 01: Data drive – 4 x WD 5TB SE HDDs (WD5001F9YZ) in RAID5 on HP Dynamic Smart Array P222 RAID Controller Card – Ports 1, 2, 3, & 4 (each SATA III or 6GB/s) – mounted in Bays 1, 2, 3, & 4 of drive main cage
    Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B (I used the existing SATA cable that had gone to the optical drive for bay 5 plus a Blue 18” SATA cable I had in stock from previous projects for Bay 6; StarTech Model SAS8087S450 19” (50cm) Serial Attached SCSI SAS Cable – SFF-8087 to 4x Latching SATA for Bays 1, 2, 3, & 4; I also used a Molex Y to two SATA Power Connectors)
    Video card – HD5450
    60mm Fan mounted near the bottom front of ML10v2 to increase air flow for the P222 and Video card
    60mm Fan mounted in empty card slot to direct air flow directly on P222 heat sink (plus Molex to Fan splitter and Y Fan to 2 Fan connector cable)
     
     
    Be sure to check out Parts 1 and 2 of this 3 part series where I cover the Unboxing and Installation of Icy Dock’s ExpressCage MB326SP-B in my HP ProLiant ML10v2.
     
    Then later, please join us in the HSS Forums to discuss this and many other interesting topics. Check the HSS Forum Thread on the ExpressCage MB326SP-B for updates and comments.
     
     
     
    References:
     
    Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B http://www.icydock.com/goods.php?id=231
     
    Other HSS Icy Dock Blog Postings http://homeservershow.com/tag/icyDock
     
    HSS Forum Posting on this ExpressCage MB326SP-B: http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/12114-icy-dock-expresscage-mb326sp-b/
     
    Other HSS ML10v2 Blog Postings: http://homeservershow.com/tag/ML10v2
     
    HSS HP ProLiant ML10v2 postings: http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/forum/98-ml10-and-ml10v2/
     
    Icy Dock Play List

    Joe_Miner
    By: JohnStutsman
     
     
     

     
    Figure 1 – Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B – 6 Bay 2.5” SAS/SATA HDD Hot Swap Cage for 5.25” Bay (Photo courtesy Icy Dock)
     
     
     
    This is Part 2 of a three part series on the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B 6 Bay 2.5” SAS/SATA Hot Swap Cage for 5.25” Bay’s. In this part I will install the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B in a 5.25” bay of my HP ProLiant ML10v2 Server.
     
    Part 1: Unboxing
     
    Part 2: Installation
     
    Part 3: Performance
     
     
     
    Installing Icy Dock’s ExpressCage MB326SP-B in my ML10v2
     
    As stated in Part 1: Recently, Dave asked me to review the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B 6 Bay 2.5” SAS/SATA Hot Swap Cage for 5.25” Bay’s (“ExpressCage”). I had the perfect application in my HP ProLiant ML10v2 where with the addition of a P222 I had 10 SATA Ports but only a main cage for four 3.5” drives and two 5.25” Bay’s. With the MB326SP-B I could put six drives in the Icy Dock ExpressCage using one 5.25” bay and still have a 5.25” bay available for future expansion or projects (a huge plus in my book).
     
    The Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B had many “Key Features” that I found very intriguing but obviously the most important in my mind was being able to install six 2.5” HDDs/SSDs up to 9.5mm thick in the space of one 5.25” half-height bay with hot-swap support and SAS/SATA – 6GB/s support. The additional features were certainly icing on the cake, especially when coupled with my positive previous experience with Icy Dock products.
     
    In my opinion, this ExpressCage is living up to its predecessor’s reputations. Its feel is solid and installation was easy. This is a reliable quality product perfect for many applications of the home enthusiast!
     
     
     

     
    Figure 2 – Key Features of the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B (Photo courtesy Icy Dock)
     
     
     

     
    Figure 3 – My ExpressCage MB326SP-B and box contents laid out on a Static Mat before installation. I really appreciated how the bags are labeled, by Icy Dock, containing the Device screws (12 plus 2 spares) M3*2.5 and 2.5 HDD screws (8 plus 2 spares) M3*4. A good indication of the thought that went into the design and packaging of the ExpressCage!
     
     
     

     
    Figure 4 – My ExpressCage MB326SP-B with drive caddy’s 2, 4, & 6 opened – on Static Mat before installation.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 5 – The back of the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B with all 6 SATA data cables connected and 2 SATA power connections. I made all of the connections outside of the ML10v2 then slid the ExpressCage into the bottom 5.25” bay of the ML10v2.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 6 – Another view of the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B with all cables connected just before sliding into the bottom 5.25” bay of the ML10v2.
     
     
     

     
    Video 1 – Installing my Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B
     
     
     

     
    Figure 7 – Side view of the HP ProLiant ML10v2 with the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B installed in the lower 5.25” bay. The heads of the two Device screws (2 x M3*2.5) are visible holding the ExpressCage securely in place.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 8 – Front view of the HP ProLiant ML10v2 with the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B installed in the lower 5.25” bay. The six drives in the ExpressCage are active as well as the four drives in the lower main drive cage for a total of ten drives in the ML10v2. AND my top 5.25” bay is free for future projects or additions!
     
     
     

     
    Figure 9 – Front view of the HP ProLiant ML10v2 with the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B installed in the lower 5.25” bay with front panel replaced on ML10v2.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 10 – Front view of the HP ProLiant ML10v2 with the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B installed in the lower 5.25” bay. Booted up to desktop view. Note Windows Home Server 2011 connector in upper left of the screen.
     
     
     
     
     

     
    Figure 11 – Data Sheet for the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB324SP-B (Photo courtesy Icy Dock)
     
     
     

     
    Figure 12 – Front view of the HP ProLiant ML10v2 with the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B installed in the lower 5.25” bay. Booted up to desktop view. Note Windows Home Server 2011 connector in upper left of the screen File Explorer opened showing the four logical drives in the ML10v2.
     
     
     
    As-Built (I named my Computer: SkyNet)


    HP ProLiant ML10v2 Gen9
    Xeon E3-1220v3
    32GB Unbuffered ECC RAM KVR16E11K4/32
    B120i Logical Drive 01: OS drive – 1 x Corsair Force GT 240GB SSD in RAID0 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – Port 1 (SATA III or 6GB/s) -- Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B Bay 1
    OS: Windows 8.1 Pro
    B120i Logical Drive 02: Data drive – 1 x Samsung 256GB 840 Pro SSD in RAID0 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – Port 2 (SATA III or 6GB/s) – Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B Bay 2
    B120i Logical Drive 03: Data drive -- 4 x WD10JUCT 1TB 2.5” HDDs in RAID10 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – Ports 3, 4, 5, & 6 (each SATA II or 3GB/s) – Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B Bays 3, 4, 5, & 6
    P222 Logical Drive 01: Data drive – 4 x WD 5TB SE HDDs (WD5001F9YZ) in RAID5 on HP Dynamic Smart Array P222 RAID Controller Card – Ports 1, 2, 3, & 4 (each SATA III or 6GB/s) – mounted in Bays 1, 2, 3, & 4 of drive main cage
    Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B (I used the existing SATA cable that had gone to the optical drive for bay 5 plus a Blue 18” SATA cable I had in stock from previous projects for Bay 6; StarTech Model SAS8087S450 19” (50cm) Serial Attached SCSI SAS Cable – SFF-8087 to 4x Latching SATA for Bays 1, 2, 3, & 4; I also used a Molex Y to two SATA Power Connectors)
    Video card – HD5450
    60mm Fan mounted (using cable ties) near the bottom front of ML10v2 to increase air flow for the P222 and Video card
    60mm Fan mounted (using cable ties)  in empty card slot to direct air flow directly on P222 heat sink (plus Molex to Fan splitter and Y Fan to 2 Fan connector cable)
     
     
    Be sure to check out Part 3 of this 3 part series where I measure the Performance of the ExpressCage MB326SP-B in my HP ProLiant ML10v2 while previously in Part 1 I showed the Unboxing of my ExpressCage MB326SP-B.
     
    Then later, please join us in the HSS Forums to discuss this and many other interesting topics.
     
     
     
    References:
     
    Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B http://www.icydock.com/goods.php?id=231
     
    Other HSS Icy Dock Blog Postings http://homeservershow.com/tag/icyDock
     
    HSS Forum Posting on this ExpressCage MB326SP-B: http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/12114-icy-dock-expresscage-mb326sp-b/
     
    Other HSS ML10v2 Blog Postings: http://homeservershow.com/tag/ML10v2
     
    HSS HP ProLiant ML10v2 postings: http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/forum/98-ml10-and-ml10v2/
     
    Icy Dock Play List
     
     

    Joe_Miner

    Unboxing The Icy Dock 5.25” ExpressCage MB326SP-B

    By Joe_Miner, in NAS,

    By: JohnStutsman
     
     
     

     
    Figure 1 – Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B – 4 Bay 2.5” SAS/SATA HDD Hot Swap Cage for 5.25” Bay (Photo courtesy Icy Dock)
     
     
     
    This is the first of a three part series on the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B 6 Bay 2.5” SAS/SATA Hot Swap Cage for 5.25” Bay’s.
     
    Part 1: Unboxing
     
    Part 2: Installation
     
    Part 3: Performance
     
     
     
    Part 1: Unboxing Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B
     
    Recently, Dave asked me to review the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B 6 Bay 2.5” SAS/SATA Hot Swap Cage for 5.25” Bay’s (“ExpressCage”). I had the perfect application in my HP ProLiant ML10v2 where with the addition of a P222 I had 10 SATA Ports but only a main cage for four 3.5” drives and two 5.25” Bay’s. With the MB326SP-B I could put six drives in the Icy Dock ExpressCage using one 5.25” bay and still have a 5.25” bay available for future expansion or projects (a huge plus in my book).
     
     
     
    Specifications of the ExpressCage
     
    Icy Dock provided a list of specifications and product detail that I found very intriguing including support for six 2.5” HDDs/SSDs up to 9.5mm thick, hot-swap support, and SAS/SATA – 6GB/s support. All in a 5.25” half-height form factor needing only two SATA power ports. Having worked with the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB324SP-B at HSS MeetUp 2015 (#Best MeetUpEver) and experiencing very good results in a HP ProLiant N40L MicroServer and in a Lian-Li PC-K9WX Desktop I was excited to get started! I wasn’t disappointed!
     
     
     

     
    Figure 2 – Specifications of the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B (Photo courtesy Icy Dock)
     
     
     

     
    Figure 3 – The ExpressCage MB326SP-B requires two 15 Pin SATA Power connectors to power the 6 drive bays in the MB326SP-B which greatly simplified the power cabling inside the ML10v2. The ML10v2 had two 15 Pin SATA Power connectors that I could have used but I wanted to be able to connect all my cabling outside the ML10v2 before sliding into the 5.25” bay so I used a 8” Molex Y splitter to two 15 Pin SATA Power connectors cable and installation was a snap!
     
     
     

     
    Figure 4 – The ability to control the fan speed settings is a great feature – with 2 SSDs and 4 HDDs in my MB325SP-B I chose to set my fans on high during installation just to help with cooling of the HDDs as well as the interior of the ML10v2 (Photo courtesy Icy Dock)
     
     
     

     
    Figure 5 – The extra thought in the design to allow me to switch out the 40mm cooling fans in the future is a great indicator of good design practice, in my opinion (Photo courtesy Icy Dock)
     
     
     

     
    Figure 6 – I like to use locking clips and appreciate the physical and audio feedback they provide during installation. The Blue LED’s provide me feedback that the drives are powered and it’s kind of cool, in my opinion, when the drives are being accessed and the Blue LED’s are flashing (Photo courtesy Icy Dock)
     
     
     

     
    Figure 7 – The built-in screws secure the drives well that I was using (Photo courtesy Icy Dock)
     
     
     

     
    Figure 8 – Icy Dock provides screws that could be used to further secure the drives to the caddy but I found no need for them – it is nice that they are available though (Photo courtesy Icy Dock)
     
     
     
    When the ExpressCage MB326SP-B arrived, I wanted to unbox it as soon as I could and get to work!
     
     
     

     
    Video 1 – Unboxing my Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B
     
     
     

     
    Figure 9 – My ExpressCage MB326SP-B and box contents laid out on a Static Mat
     
     
     

     
    Figure 10 – My ExpressCage MB326SP-B next to the included, LABLED, packages of HDD/SS 8 x M3*2.5 screws and Device 12 x M3*4 screws (each package with 2 extra screws so actually 10 and 14 screws respectively)! I was very impressed by this packaging organization, especially the labeling, and took it as a sign illustrating the thought and design care that goes into Icy Dock products!
     
     
     

     
    Figure 11 – Key Features of the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B (Photo courtesy Icy Dock)
     
     
     

     
    Figure 12 – Data Sheet for the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB324SP-B (Photo courtesy Icy Dock)
     
     
     

     
    Figure 13 – Icy Dock ExpressCage MB324SP-B installed in my HP ProLiant ML10v2
     
     
     
    As-Built (I named my Computer: SkyNet)


    HP ProLiant ML10v2 Gen9
    Xeon E3-1220v3
    32GB Unbuffered ECC RAM KVR16E11K4/32
    B120i Logical Drive 01: OS drive – 1 x Corsair Force GT 240GB SSD in RAID0 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – Port 1 (SATA III or 6GB/s) -- Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B Bay 1
    OS: Windows 8.1 Pro
    B120i Logical Drive 02: Data drive – 1 x Samsung 256GB 840 Pro SSD in RAID0 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – Port 2 (SATA III or 6GB/s) – Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B Bay 2
    B120i Logical Drive 03: Data drive -- 4 x WD10JUCT 1TB 2.5” HDDs in RAID10 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – Ports 3, 4, 5, & 6 (each SATA II or 3GB/s) – Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B Bays 3, 4, 5, & 6
    P222 Logical Drive 01: Data drive – 4 x WD 5TB SE HDDs (WD5001F9YZ) in RAID5 on HP Dynamic Smart Array P222 RAID Controller Card – Ports 1, 2, 3, & 4 (each SATA III or 6GB/s) – mounted in Bays 1, 2, 3, & 4 of drive main cage 
    Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B (I used the existing SATA cable that had gone to the optical drive for bay 6 plus a Blue 18” SATA cable I had in stock from previous projects for Bay 5; StarTech Model SAS8087S450 19” (50cm) Serial Attached SCSI SAS Cable – SFF-8087 to 4x Latching SATA for Bays 1, 2, 3, & 4; I also used a Molex Y to two SATA Power Connectors)
    Video card
    60mm Fan mounted near the bottom front of ML10v2 to increase air flow for the P222 and Video card
    40mm Fan mounted in empty card slot to direct air flow directly on P222 heat sink (plus Molex to Fan splitter and Y Fan to 2 Fan connector cable)
     
     
    Be sure to check in Part 2 of this 3 part series where I discuss the Installation of the ExpressCage MB326SP-B in my HP ProLiant ML10v2 while in Part 3 I show the Performance of my ML10v2 logical drives with the ExpressCage MB326SP-B installed.
     
    Then later, please join us in the HSS Forums to discuss this and many other interesting topics.
     
     
     
    References:
     
    Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B http://www.icydock.com/goods.php?id=231
     
    Other HSS Icy Dock Blog Postings http://homeservershow.com/tag/icyDock
     
    Other HSS ML10v2 Blog Postings: http://homeservershow.com/tag/ML10v2
     
    HSS HP ProLiant ML10v2 postings: http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/forum/98-ml10-and-ml10v2/
     
    Icy Dock Play List

    Dave

    Surface Studio

    By Dave, in Blog,

    Panos Panay just wowed the Microsoft crowd with two incredible hardware reveals. The first was the SurfaceBook i7 with a whopping 16 hours of battery life.  The second was Surface Studio. I dare you to call it an "All in One" after today.
     
    I'll be chatting about all this gear on my new podcast, RESET. Find it here: mccabe.io
     
     
     

     
    Surface Studio
     
    The specs of Studio are impressive but visually it is stunning. It has 28" of wow that can be manipulated to however you prefer to create.
     

     
    Screen: 28" PixelSense Display
    Resolution: 4500 x 3000 (192 DPI)
    Color settings: Adobe sRGB, DCI-P3 and Vivid Color Profiles, Individually color calibrated
    Touch: 10-point multi-touch
    Aspect Ratio: 3:2
    Surface Pen
    Zero Gravity Hinge
    Quad-core 6th Gen Intel Core i5 or i7
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 965M 2GB GPU GDDR5 memory or NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980M 4GB GPU GDDR5 memory
     
    It looks like a creative persons dream machine.  Apple picked a bad week to follow Microsoft when it comes to hardware reveals.  I personally would like to try the Studio and Dial with some video editing software.  I think it will be great for that.
     
    Look at the Microsoft Store online for more photos.  It really is a nice looking Surface. Link Here.
     
    Surface Book
     
    The Surface Book is plain and simple; More.  More graphics and more battery.  It's a little heavier and starts at 3.6 pounds where last year's Surface Book was 3.3 pounds.  Maybe it's the new 6th Gen Intel Core i7 or the i7: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 965M with 2GB of GDDR5 memory.  That's nice but Panos stated they just put in more battery!  It's nice to see that.  Adds a little weight but for those that want the battery life it's a welcome change.
     

     
     
     
    Surface Dial
    The Dial is impressive.  It's compatible with any Windows 10 enabled PC, laptop, or tablet as long as it has the Anniversary Update.  Don't try this with your Surface Pro but it will stick to the screen of the Surface Studio!  It will have optimized off screen compatibility with Surface Book and SP4.
     
    It's a jog dial on steroids and Panos and software partners demo'd many uses of it. Color wheel, zoom in, etc.  It's $99 and can be purchased now for delivery on November 10th.
     

     
    Thanks for shopping with my links.  Maybe I can get one too!

    Dave

    Surface Studio

    By Dave, in Surface Geeks,

    Panos Panay just wowed the Microsoft crowd with two incredible hardware reveals. The first was the SurfaceBook i7 with a whopping 16 hours of battery life.  The second was Surface Studio. I dare you to call it an "All in One" after today.
     
    I'll be chatting about all this gear on my new podcast, RESET. Find it here: mccabe.io
     
     
     

     
    Surface Studio
     
    The specs of Studio are impressive but visually it is stunning. It has 28" of wow that can be manipulated to however you prefer to create.
     

     
    Screen: 28" PixelSense Display
    Resolution: 4500 x 3000 (192 DPI)
    Color settings: Adobe sRGB, DCI-P3 and Vivid Color Profiles, Individually color calibrated
    Touch: 10-point multi-touch
    Aspect Ratio: 3:2
    Surface Pen
    Zero Gravity Hinge
    Quad-core 6th Gen Intel Core i5 or i7
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 965M 2GB GPU GDDR5 memory or NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980M 4GB GPU GDDR5 memory
     
    It looks like a creative persons dream machine.  Apple picked a bad week to follow Microsoft when it comes to hardware reveals.  I personally would like to try the Studio and Dial with some video editing software.  I think it will be great for that.
     
    Look at the Microsoft Store online for more photos.  It really is a nice looking Surface. Link Here.
     
    Surface Book
     
    The Surface Book is plain and simple; More.  More graphics and more battery.  It's a little heavier and starts at 3.6 pounds where last year's Surface Book was 3.3 pounds.  Maybe it's the new 6th Gen Intel Core i7 or the i7: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 965M with 2GB of GDDR5 memory.  That's nice but Panos stated they just put in more battery!  It's nice to see that.  Adds a little weight but for those that want the battery life it's a welcome change.
     

     
     
     
    Surface Dial
    The Dial is impressive.  It's compatible with any Windows 10 enabled PC, laptop, or tablet as long as it has the Anniversary Update.  Don't try this with your Surface Pro but it will stick to the screen of the Surface Studio!  It will have optimized off screen compatibility with Surface Book and SP4.
     
    It's a jog dial on steroids and Panos and software partners demo'd many uses of it. Color wheel, zoom in, etc.  It's $99 and can be purchased now for delivery on November 10th.
     

     
    Thanks for shopping with my links.  Maybe I can get one too!

    Dave

    Announcing RESET Podcast

    By Dave, in Blog,

    Hey HSS Fans. I want to introduce you to my new podcast. RESET.




    RESET will take all the good from Home Server Show and Surface Geeks while adding automation and gadgets. It will leave behind all the bad podcasting habits!
     

     
    Find it at http://mccabe.io and in your favorite podcast app.  Just search "reset" and you should find the paperclip.  Also on:
     
    iTunes
     
    Google Play
     
    RSS

    Dave

    Surface Geeks Final Episode

    By Dave, in Surface Geeks,

    It's the final Surface Geeks! Listen in to find out what is going on and where Surface Geeks is headed. Check out my new podcast, RESET where ever you download podcasts or at http://mccabe.io
     
    A big thanks to all who have supported and helped me put Surface Geeks out there. It was a great ride. See you on RESET!
     
     

    Dave

    Meetup 2016 Wrap Up

    By Dave, in Blog,

    Seriously.  Do I even have to say #bestmeetupever?  It totally was the best!  Kidding aside, it was a fantastic weekend and I have a great review of it by a forum member.  I think it is best to let Phil explain.


    Even if you don’t live close to Indianapolis; participating in a Meet-Up from UK or mainland Europe is completely do-able as I proved this weekend. Flying to and from Indianapolis from Norwich in England was smooth, efficient (11 hours) and affordable (~£600). Several US based participants travelled far longer than my easy straight forward journey.
     
    Having enjoyed and learned so much from HGG/HSS for several years; attending a Meet-Up had been an aspiration for ages. But until this year, joining one had always seemed impractical.
     
    In the forums I’ve always lurked more than posted, but the few times I have left voice mails or messages I’ve been impressed with the prompt well thought out responses and spirit of our community.
     
    Meet-Up 2016 started with an ice-breaker on Friday evening where we all met each other in advance of the main event on Saturday. Our tour of Dave’s HSS HQ, where we saw an impressive home IT system, was inspirational and made me realise how limited my home set up is. Afterwards we went to Fry’s where we geeked out in an amazing huge one stop shop “boy’s toys” supermarket. Our tasty casual burger and beer dinner together rounded the introductions and evening off so well. Meeting Dave and Jim was a highlight; albeit unusual, as I felt as if I knew them both but of course they knew nothing of me.
     
    Saturday’s main Meet Up in the Microsoft Indianapolis training room completely met my expectations. Dave, aided by Jim, cleverly scheduled a series of informal periods and organised topical presentations. Our breakfast coffee with pastries, catered bbq lunch and afternoon ice-cream bar were tasty and enjoyed by all of us. Big appreciations to Microsoft for making the venue available to us. Several individuals and companies generously donated gear for a substantial give-away at the end of the day. Big thanks to Synology, Securifi, Home8, Insteon, Silicon Dust, Kevin Schoonover, Alan Eisen, Jim Shoemaker, John Aydellote, Dewain Robinson. Special thanks to itGeeks who donated the big prize of a three pack of Lumas which I was lucky enough to win. I also won a completely misnamed “box of crap” donated by Kevin Schoonover, which is full of interesting stuff. Afterwards we descended on mass to the nearby Microsoft Store where the staff made us welcome and several of us bought some tasty kit. Our dinner together in a nearby Irish Bar rounded off the day.
     
    This morning we enjoyed a farewell breakfast in a rural Waffle House and said our goodbyes. This particular Waffle House personified my mental model of a USA diner complete with booths and bar to eat at.
     
    Today I’ve explored downtown Indianapolis where I needed to buy a suitcase to bring home all my shopping and kit I’d won.
     
    All of you who have thought about attending a Meet-Up; I urge you to take action and book a ticket next year. You won’t regret it.
     
    Special thanks and well done to Dave for organising Meet-Up 2016 for us to all enjoy.
     
     
    Chris Compton was shooting 360 video all day and brought some awesome give away items.  Check out some of the 360 video here.  I also have a few photos that I took and will pursue attendee photos to show you as well.
     
     
     
    [gallery ids=17441,17445,17444,17443,17442,17438,17439,17440,17437,17435,17434,17429,17431,17432,17433,17416,17446]
     
    Featured photo by Vinylfreak

    Dave

    Home Server Show 306- Final Episode

    By Dave, in Blog,

    That day has come! We all come up on "that day," either with joy or dismay.  I have a little bit of both that I'm publishing the last episode of the Home Server Show.  It all started in 2008 and now comes to end.  My podcasting is not over however.  I have a brand new show and I'll talk about that in this last episode.  I'll also talk about how HSS started and we will bookend this journey with Ian Dixon who was my first interview and on the first episode.
     
    Check out RESET at mccabe.io
     
    I gave brief thanks and mentions during this short episode.  Honestly, I could have spent an hour listing people.  I wanted to type them out here.  I don't know why but I really didn't want choke up during that last episode.  Seems silly right?
     
    The other thing is I've stared at this post for hours.  I can't possibly list everyone.  I am going to leave someone out and it's not on purpose.  I've aged folks.  Why do you think I started a forum?  So I could ask questions to you guys!  I can't possibly list you all and I'm sorry if you don't see your name here.
     
    Many thanks to all who have interviewed with me, talked to me about their gear, have and continue to participate in my many forums.  You have participated in all my crazy ideas, my popular ones and my failed ones!  Thank you as well to everyone who has co-hosted with me on Home Server Show and Surface Geeks.   There is no way I could list all those people but Chris Lux, John Zajdler, and Jim Collison stick out in my mind.  What a wonderful time we had together during the HSS Version 1 days.  Jim, thanks for sticking with me
     
    Speaking of hey days. Ian Dixon, Andrew Edney, Alex Kuretz, Terry Walsh, Phillip Churchill, Christopher Courtney, Kevin Schoonover, John Stutsman, Chris Kenney, Rich O'Neal, Mike Faucher, Jose Ortiz, Michael Martis, Tim Daleo, Jim McCarthy, Jim Clark, Garry Whittaker, Dewain Robinson, Kyle Reddoch, John Wiskowski, Darren Cohen, Synology, WD, Icy Dock, and you.  Yes, you reading this.  That's who I have to thank. All who have listened.  All who have read.
     
    Every single one of the V1 Add-In Developers.  You guys rocked.
     
    All the top posters in the HSS Forums.
     
    Meetup attendees. You are a crazy bunch!
     
    Microsoft.  WHS Team, Ex Softie, now Amazon Alexa: Charlie Kindel, Surface Team, Windows Insider Team. The Indianapolis Microsoft Store for treating me like a "big shot."  Nanette Winter, the community director, for coming through with all my requests.
     
    Thanks for a great ride.  I hope you like RESET and I'll see you in the forums.

  • Our picks

    • I throw this out every once in a while.  Is anyone interested in writing up "semi-formal" reviews here on the forums?  I say semi-formal because they don't have to be pro level, just a good attempt at telling the story about the gear.  Something you have purchased lately.  You don't have to go buy stuff, just incorporate what you have already have purchased.  Hit me up with any questions.  You never know where it will lead!
        • Like
      • 2 replies
    • D-Link has dropped a couple of new products and additions to their lineup of smart home gear.  Hold on because there is a lot of gear!
      Let's start with cameras.  D-Link has new Wi-Fi cameras, the Full HD Pan and Tilt Pro Wi-Fi Camera (DCS-8302LH) and Full HD Indoor and Outdoor Pro Wi-Fi Camera (DCS-8526LH).  These are not just new, and good looking cams, they can now perform people detection and glass break detection.  The new cameras also feature expanded ways for customers to save video, including ONVIF Profile S, which enables custom storage and streaming options to personal NAS devices, built-in storage microSD capacity up to 256 GB, as well as free and paid cloud storage options. 
       

       
      This year's camera models include both an indoor and an outdoor model. The outdoor model features a spotlight and siren that can be triggered when motion is detected, deterring potential intruders. The indoor model pans around to give a full 360-degree view of any room and tracks motion. Both include two-way audio. 
      Full HD Pan and Tilt Pro Wi-Fi Camera is the model (DCS-8302LH), available in Q2, 2020, and retail pricing will be $99.99.
      Full HD Indoor and Outdoor Pro Wi-Fi Camera is the model (DCS-8526LH), available in Q3, 2020, and retail pricing will be $119.99.
      One of my favorite products is Wi-Fi.  D-Link has a whole lot of new products coming including Wi-Fi 6, Mesh, Alexa and Google Assistant integration, IFTTT, Parental Controls, and more!
       

       
      There are so many new SKU's that I can't make heads or tails of them!  I'm going to be speaking with D-Link more this week and will sort all of these out. I do want you to see all they are offering and what the release date and projected retail pricing will be.

      AC1900 Scalable Mesh Wi-Fi Router (COVR-1900-US), Q1 2020, $119.99
      AC1750 Mesh Wi-Fi Router (DIR-1750-US), Q1 2020, $99.99
      AC1900 Mesh Wi-Fi Router (DIR-1950-US), Q1 2020, $119.99
      AC1750 Mesh Wi-Fi Range Extender (DAP-1755-US), Q1 2020, $99.99
      AC1950 Mesh Wi-Fi Range Extender (DAP-1955-US), Q1 2020, $109.99
      Smart AX1500 Mesh Wi-Fi 6 Router (DIR-X1560-US), Q1 2020, $119.99
      Smart AX1800 Mesh Wi-Fi 6 Router (DIR-X1870-US), Q2 2020, $139.99
      Smart AX2400 Mesh Wi-Fi 6 Router (DIR-X2460-US), Q3 2020, $159.99
      Smart AX5400 Mesh Wi-Fi 6 Router (DIR-X5460-US), Q1 2020, $279.99
      AX1800 Mesh Wi-Fi 6 Range Extender (DAP-X1870-US), Q2 2020, $129.99
      AX1800 Whole Home Mesh System (COVR-X1872-US), QX22020, $269.99
        • Like
      • 0 replies
    • RESET Merch Shop
      Get ya Merch here!  I've created a T-Shirt shop with the famous RESET paperclip. I've pasted that clip on just about everything so you can wear it around town!  Cable bags, Coffee Mugs, T-Shirts, and more. 
       
      https://reset.threadless.com/
       
      or you can get it it via
       
      https://reset.fm/store
       
      Here is the main design.
       

       
      Below is a part of the order that I put in!  
       
       

       
      The Heather Grey above is the Extra Soft version and it is awesome.  I highly recommend the softness!    The "Chili Red" is the Tri-Blend and probably my favorite feel and color.

       
      This is the Zip-Up Hoody, Heather Indigo, Sponge Fleece, Men's, Large.  In my podcast I couldn't remember what style it was but it is Sponge Fleece. It's REALLY soft on the inside. Soft outside as well. The only problem is with the zip up hoody the logo is on the back. Regular hoody, it will be on the front.
       
      https://reset.threadless.com/
       
      or you can get it it via
       
      https://reset.fm/store
       
      Thank you for supporting this community. Everything you purchase will help keep the lights on the hard drives spinning.
       
      • 0 replies
    • OneDrive Personal Vault and expandable storage
      Microsoft's OneDrive has a few new features and options worth pointing out.  Personal Vault and Expandable Storage.
       
      Personal Vault is a protected area in OneDrive that can only be accessed with a strong authentication method or a second step of identity verification, such as your fingerprint, face, PIN, or a code sent to you via email or SMS. 
       
      Personal Vault gives you an added layer of protection for your most important files, photos, and videos—for example, copies of documents such as your passport, driver’s license, or insurance information—should someone gain access to your account or device.
      Plus, this added security won’t slow you down. You can quickly access your important documents, photos, and files with confidence wherever you are, on your PC, OneDrive.com, or your mobile device.

       
      Beyond a second layer of identity verification, Personal Vault also includes the following security measures:
       
      Scan and shoot—Using the OneDrive app, you can scan documents or shoot photos directly into your Personal Vault, keeping them off less secure areas of your device, like your camera roll.
      Automatic locking—No need to worry about whether you left your Personal Vault or your files open—both will close and lock automatically after a period of inactivity.
      BitLocker encryption—On Windows 10 PCs, OneDrive automatically syncs your Personal Vault files to a BitLocker-encrypted area of your local hard drive.
      Restricted sharing—To prevent accidental sharing, files in Personal Vault and shared items moved into Personal Vault cannot be shared.
       
      Taken together, these security measures help ensure that Personal Vault files are not stored unprotected on your PC, and your files have additional protection, even if your Windows 10 PC or mobile device is lost, stolen, or someone gains access to it or to your account.
       
      Expandable Storage
       
      If you are and Office 365 Subscriber you get 1 TB of OneDrive storage space with all the other Office goodies like Word, Excel, etc.  I know personally that I have gone over the 1TB limit and have always wanted to be able to add additional storage to my account.  Now you can!

       
      Pick and option and keep on hoarding, errr, I mean saving! Cancel anytime, upgrade at any moment.
      • 1 reply
    • Ubiquiti adds new items to the Unifi Line including UAP Flex HD and the Unifi Dream machine
      Ubiquiti has been busy.  There area ton of new items to recently released and I'm going to share two of my favorites.
       
      The UAP Flex HD and the Unifi Dream machine. The Flex HD is a mouthful of descriptors like most of UI gear is.  It's a 2Ghz 2x2 MIMO, 5GHz 4x4 MU-MIMO, POE, Indoor/Outdoor, multi mount, mesh point that is no bigger than a can of Coke.

       
      You will still need the Unifi controller although you can configure it with basic functionality with the Unifi App.  I've always found it's best to configure with your controller and then use the app as an add-on.  There are several mounting options that include sitting it on a shelf! That is something that Unifi has not had before unless you count the ceiling AP I have awkwardly mounted placed on top of a few books.  It can be found on the Unifi store for $179.
       
      https://store.ui.com/collections/wireless/products/unifi-flexhd
       
      The Dream Machine is an altogether different beast that I hope lives up to its naming.  This is the gateway drug, for lack of a better term, to the Unifi world.  The starter kit.  It is an Access Point, Gigabit Switch, Security Gateway, and the Cloud Key all in one package.  The latter being the most significant as this is something that has deterred new users from getting started with Unifi.  Requiring new users to purchase a $100 item just to run the AP's has been somewhat of a roadblock in the past.  Granted, that is improving every year with the ability to run it in the cloud, on a NAS, a Pi, Docker, MacOS, and of course Windows, it is still a barricade to getting up and running when manufacturers such as Eero offer simplicity in an app.
       

       
      The switch includes 4 LAN Ports and 1 WAN port.  All of which are Gigabit and security services such as IPS are rated at Gigabit speed. It's $299 in the Unifi store but I'm unsure how nicely it will play with other Unifi gear.  This may be a nice "first AP" with its built in Cloud Key if you can add additional units or other Unifi access points.
       
      https://store.ui.com/collections/routing-switching/products/unifi-dream-machine
      • 4 replies


×
×
  • Create New...