Jump to content
RESET Forums (homeservershow.com)
  • Joe_Miner
    Joe_Miner
    Sign in to follow this  

    Performance with my Icy Dock 5.25” ExpressCage MB326SP-B

    By: JohnStutsman

     

     

     

    Figure01-300x199.jpg

     

    Figure 1 – Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B – 6 Bay 2.5” SAS/SATA HDD Hot Swap Cage installed in the lower 5.25” Bay of my HP ProLiant ML10v2

     

     

     

    This is Part 3 of a three part series on the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B 6 Bay 2.5” SAS/SATA Hot Swap Cage for 5.25” Bay’s. In this part I measured the performance of my HP ProLiant ML10v2 Server with the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B in the lower (of two) 5.25” bay.

     

    Part 1: Unboxing

     

    Part 2: Installation

     

    Part 3: Performance

     

     

     

    Performance

     

    As stated in Part 1: Recently, Dave asked me to review the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B 6 Bay 2.5” SAS/SATA Hot Swap Cage for 5.25” Bay’s (“ExpressCage”). I had the perfect application in my HP ProLiant ML10v2 where the addition of a P222 I had 10 SATA Ports but only a main cage for four 3.5” drives and two 5.25” Bay’s. With the MB326SP-B I could put six drives in the Icy Dock ExpressCage using one 5.25” bay and still have a 5.25” bay available for future expansion or projects (a huge plus in my book). ExpressCage holds 6 drives (2 SSDs and 4 HDDs in my use case) that are the basis of three logical drives in the B120i embedded on the ML10v2’s system board.

     

    The Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B had many “Key Features” that I found very intriguing but obviously the most important in my mind was being able to install six 2.5” HDDs/SSDs up to 9.5mm thick in the space of one 5.25” half-height bay with hot-swap support and SAS/SATA – 6GB/s support. The additional features were certainly icing on the cake, especially when coupled with my positive experience with other Icy Dock products.

     

    In my opinion, this ExpressCage is living up to its predecessor’s reputations. Its feel is solid and installation was easy. This is a reliable quality product perfect for many applications of the home enthusiast!

     

     

     

    Figure02-300x156.jpg

     

    Figure 2 – Key Features of the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B (Photo courtesy Icy Dock)

     

     

     

    Figure03-207x300.jpg

     

    Figure 3 – Storage information for the ML10v2 via iLO4 showing 10 physical drives supporting 3 logical drives on the B120i and 1 logical drive on the P222.

     

     

     

    As shown in Figure 3, above, the 10 physical drives in my ML10v2 support 4 logical drives.

     

    Three logical drives are driven by the B120i HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID controller embedded on the system board of the HP ProLiant ML10v2. These three logical drives are made up from the 6 physical drives mounted in the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B.

     

    The performance of these three logical drives, illustrated in Figures 4, 5, and 6 below, conforms with what I’ve seen in the past with these drives and assures me that the SATA interface of the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B is transparent to the SATA signal from the B120i (i.e. I could not detect any speed degradation). All six bays of the ExpressCage MB326SP-B are rated SATA III or 6GB/s by Icy Dock but of course the transfer rates are dependent of the rated speeds of the Ports from the ML10v2 controller board where SATA Ports 1 & 2 are rated at SATA III or 6GB/s while SATA Ports 3-6 are rated at SATA II or 3GB/s.

     

     

     

    Figure04-300x156.jpg

     

    Figure 4 – Performance measured with ATTO, CrystalDiskMark, and HD Tune Pro for B120i Logical Drive 01: OS drive – 1 x Corsair Force GT 240GB SSD in RAID0 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – Port 1 (SATA III or 6GB/s) -- Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B Bay 1 (rated SATA III or 6GB/s)

     

     

     

    Figure05-300x156.jpg

     

    Figure 5 – Performance measured with ATTO, CrystalDiskMark, and HD Tune Pro for B120i Logical Drive 02: Data drive – 1 x Samsung 256GB 840 Pro SSD in RAID0 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – Port 2 (SATA III or 6GB/s) – Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B Bay 2 (rated SATA III or 6GB/s)

     

     

     

    Figure06-300x155.jpg

     

    Figure 6 – Performance measured with ATTO, CrystalDiskMark, and HD Tune Pro for B120i Logical Drive 03: Data drive -- 4 x WD10JUCT 1TB 2.5” HDDs in RAID10 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – Ports 3, 4, 5, & 6 (each SATA II or 3GB/s) – Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B Bays 3, 4, 5, & 6 (each rated SATA III or 6GB/s)

     

     

     

    The fourth logical drive in my HP ProLiant ML10v2 is driven by the HP P222 Dynamic Smart Array RAID controller in card slot 3 of the ML10v2 as shown in Figure 3 earlier. The P222’s logical drive 01 performance is illustrated in Figure 7 below. The performance of this logical drive wouldn’t have been impacted by the installation of the ExpressCage MB326SP-B (except “possibly” temperature loading inside the ML10v2) but I included it in this report to serve as a complete assessment of my “As-Built” ML10v2.

     

     

     

    Figure07-300x155.jpg

     

    Figure 7 – Performance measured with ATTO, CrystalDiskMark, and HD Tune Pro for P222 Logical Drive 01: Data drive – 4 x WD 5TB SE HDDs (WD5001F9YZ) in RAID5 on HP Dynamic Smart Array P222 RAID Controller Card – Ports 1, 2, 3, & 4 (each SATA III or 6GB/s) – mounted in Bays 1, 2, 3, & 4 of drive main cage

     

     

     

    Figure08-300x122.jpg

     

    Figure 8 – Temperature distribution inside the ML10v2 via iLO4. The system fan in BIOS is set to Optimal Cooling and the system fan speed was 6% at the time of this reading. Note that the ExpressCage MB326SP-B fans were set on high and I have two additional 60mm auxiliary fans located inside the ML10v2

     

     

     

    Figure09-300x111.jpg

     

    Figure 9 – Temperature distribution inside the ML10v2 via iLO4. The system fan in BIOS is set to Increased Cooling and the system fan speed was 19% at the time of this reading. Note that the ExpressCage MB326SP-B fans were set on high and I have two additional 60mm auxiliary fans located inside the ML10v2

     

     

     

    Figure10-300x112.jpg

     

    Figure 10 – Comparison of the Temperature distributions inside the ML10v2 via iLO4 displayed in Figure 8 on the left (BIOS system fan setting Optimal Cooling & speed was at 6%) and displayed in Figure 9 on the right (BIOS system fan setting Optimal Cooling & speed was at 19%). Important to note that the Inlet Ambient temp was 2C cooler in the second scenario.

     

     

     

    Figure11-300x142.jpg

     

    Figure 11 – Firmware Version Information in the ML10v2 via iLO4

     

     

     

    Figure12-300x199.jpg

     

    Figure 12 – Top view of the back of the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B with all SATA data and SATA power connections before inserting into the bottom 5.25” bay of the ML10v2

     

     

     

     

     

    Figure13-300x196.jpg

     

    Figure 13 – Front view of the HP ProLiant ML10v2 with the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B installed and fully populated plus the Main drive cage is fully populated and all 10 physical drives are active – power draw with the monitor is approximately 120-130W & without the monitor it’s approximately 95-105W.

     

     

     

    Figure14-300x199.jpg

     

    Figure 14 – Front view of the HP ProLiant ML10v2 with the Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B installed in the lower 5.25” bay. Booted up to desktop view. Note Windows Home Server 2011 connector in upper left of the screen File Explorer opened showing the four logical drives in the ML10v2.

     

     

     

    As-Built (I named my Computer: SkyNet)

    • HP ProLiant ML10v2 Gen9

    • Xeon E3-1220v3
    • 32GB Unbuffered ECC RAM KVR16E11K4/32
    • B120i Logical Drive 01: OS drive – 1 x Corsair Force GT 240GB SSD in RAID0 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – Port 1 (SATA III or 6GB/s) -- Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B Bay 1
    • OS: Windows 8.1 Pro
    • B120i Logical Drive 02: Data drive – 1 x Samsung 256GB 840 Pro SSD in RAID0 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – Port 2 (SATA III or 6GB/s) – Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B Bay 2
    • B120i Logical Drive 03: Data drive -- 4 x WD10JUCT 1TB 2.5” HDDs in RAID10 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – Ports 3, 4, 5, & 6 (each SATA II or 3GB/s) – Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B Bays 3, 4, 5, & 6
    • P222 Logical Drive 01: Data drive – 4 x WD 5TB SE HDDs (WD5001F9YZ) in RAID5 on HP Dynamic Smart Array P222 RAID Controller Card – Ports 1, 2, 3, & 4 (each SATA III or 6GB/s) – mounted in Bays 1, 2, 3, & 4 of drive main cage
    • Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B (I used the existing SATA cable that had gone to the optical drive for bay 5 plus a Blue 18” SATA cable I had in stock from previous projects for Bay 6; StarTech Model SAS8087S450 19” (50cm) Serial Attached SCSI SAS Cable – SFF-8087 to 4x Latching SATA for Bays 1, 2, 3, & 4; I also used a Molex Y to two SATA Power Connectors)
    • Video card – HD5450
    • 60mm Fan mounted near the bottom front of ML10v2 to increase air flow for the P222 and Video card
    • 60mm Fan mounted in empty card slot to direct air flow directly on P222 heat sink (plus Molex to Fan splitter and Y Fan to 2 Fan connector cable)

     

     

    Be sure to check out Parts 1 and 2 of this 3 part series where I cover the Unboxing and Installation of Icy Dock’s ExpressCage MB326SP-B in my HP ProLiant ML10v2.

     

    Then later, please join us in the HSS Forums to discuss this and many other interesting topics. Check the HSS Forum Thread on the ExpressCage MB326SP-B for updates and comments.

     

     

     

    References:

     

    Icy Dock ExpressCage MB326SP-B http://www.icydock.com/goods.php?id=231

     

    Other HSS Icy Dock Blog Postings http://homeservershow.com/tag/icyDock

     

    HSS Forum Posting on this ExpressCage MB326SP-B: http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/12114-icy-dock-expresscage-mb326sp-b/

     

    Other HSS ML10v2 Blog Postings: http://homeservershow.com/tag/ML10v2

     

    HSS HP ProLiant ML10v2 postings: http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/forum/98-ml10-and-ml10v2/

     

    Icy Dock Play List


    Sign in to follow this  


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Guest
    This is now closed for further comments

  • Our picks

    • OMG I'm watching HGTV off of my HDHomeRun Connect!
      I just subscribed to HD HomeRun Premium TV to see what it is all about.  Hello, I'm watching HGTV now!  Over ten years cutting the cord and this is a first.  All of those years have been with SiliconDust and the HDHR.  I had the older white ones with two coax inputs and I recall the move to the newer unit with only a single coax input as mind blowing!  I had two of the older ones so coax and splitters were a big mess.  Now, I have OTA and a good handful of cable channels.  I'm configuring it on Plex as I type this up.
       

       
       
      Get your hardware here - https://amzn.to/2BKxTkC
      Subscribe here - https://shop.silicondust.com/shop/product-category/premium-tv/
      • 5 replies
    • NetXMS - Alternative to Domotz
      PRTG vs. Domotz
      https://www.domotz.com/
       
      • 6 replies
    • Microsoft announced a new Surface device last night, the Surface Go.  The announcement felt forced as leaks were dropping all over the place so it looks like the Surface Team just said, "what the heck," post it! 
       
      It's a confusing addition to the family. Remember Surface 3?  The Go is a much improved device but I'll have to get my hands on it in order to fully judge it.  I loved the 3 and still own it with a dock.
       
      It starts at $399 which is great but the hardware is a bit limited at that price point.  It starts with the Pentium Gold 4415y processor. Here is a comparison to show you some characteristics versus the Core i3. It also starts at 4Gb of RAM and a 64Gb eMMC drive.  It's only 1.15 pounds and will have LTE options in the future.
       
      I've read a ton of posts on this device where there is "target market" confusion.  Read it for yourself straight from Microsoft's mouth. "Empower your workforce with the lightest, most compact Surface yet"

       
       
      Here is the announcement post - https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/surface/business/surface-go
       
      Most articles are comparing it to iPad's and Chromebooks and although i think it will be a good alternative to the Chromebook I don't think it is a direct compare to the iPad nor targeting it.  I think it is a build that came from direct feedback from the working market.  A light portable with pen ability that doesn't cost $1500 if it is dropped. Pretty simple.
       

       
      My biggest disappointment is the keyboard.  Yup, gotta add $99 if you don't want to type on glass.
       
      Will enthusiasts buy it? Couch PC? Reader by the bed?  This little Surface has a lot of merit on paper so we will see how it holds up when it ships on August 2nd.  Let me know down below if you are going to get one.
       
      Buy here - https://store.microsoft.com
       
      Short Link to share - https://fave.co/2KOUe4N
       
      • 8 replies
    • How to get Cryptocurrency without mining or buying a thing
      Brave Browser and the Basic Attention Token (BAT)
       
      https://brave.com/hom691
       
      This one is new to me but the coin is not.  BAT Coin may sound funny but it is a serious "ALT" coin.  
      https://coinmarketcap.com/currencies/basic-attention-token/
      • 1 reply
    • New ToughArmor rugged drive enclosures from ICY DOCK, your storage enclosure specialists!
      ICY DOCK is the leading expert in data storage enclosures and accessories.
       
      Introducing ToughArmor
      ToughArmor is ICY DOCK’s rugged enterprise-grade line of 2.5” SSD and HDD enclosures, utilizing the standard external 5.25” bay, external 3.5” bay (floppy bay), and the slim optical bay (ODD bay). All ToughArmor models feature ruggedized full-metal enclosures and trays, to keep your sensitive data protected, as well as meeting many flammability requirements.
        • Like
      • 0 replies


×