• Dave
    The Synology router, RT1900AC, is available in the US as of today.  The highly awaited WiFi router has many features that will make it a welcome addition to your home network.  Parental Controls, 802.11ac, easy to use web GUI as well as an app to control the router.
     
    I was fortunate enough to get some hands on with it at CES 2016 and can tell that it is well deserving of the awards it received at the show.  This router has some features I've been waiting for and I can't wait to get it in my house to use.  You don't have to break the bank in order to try it out though.  It will sell for $149 and be available at most of your favorite outlets like Amazon.com.  I hope to have it in my hands soon and will give you a more detailed look.  Until then, check out the photos from CES, read the press release below, and discuss Synology and the RT1900AC in the HSS Forums.
     
     
     
     
     

     
    Synology Launches Award-Winning Router in United States

    High-speed wireless router featuring robust connectivity for homes and offices
    Bellevue, WA – February 16, 2016 – Today, Synology Inc. – a manufacturer of network attached storage (NAS) – launched its first router, the RT1900ac, in the U.S. market. The highly anticipated device has already earned several awards and recognitions globally, including a CES 2016 Innovation Awards Honoree (computer accessories category) and a Computex 2015 Gold Award. 
     
    Revolutionary Software Experience
     
    The Synology Router Manger (SRM) is the intuitive operating system that powers the RT1900ac. With a user-friendly interface, SRM makes managing your network and Wi-Fi settings simple, while delivering robust tools for users and professionals.
     
    ·Easy to Use –Desktop-like interface makes it easy for beginners to manage their entire network settings.
     
    ·Free Updates – Regular software updates means a more secure product with new features to enjoy.
     
    ·Add-on Packages – Users can download free packages and transform the RT1900ac into a VPN server, RADIUS authentication server, DNS server, media server and 24/7 download hub for their homes and offices.
     
    ·Convenient Access – Access SRM by aiming your browser at “router.synology.com” during installation, or use a customizable QuickConnect ID, DDNS address to access SRM anywhere in the world. http://bit.ly/1O7hsrx
     
    ·DS router – Available on Android or iOS devices, conveniently manage your Synology router settings from the palm of your hand. Review real time traffic monitoring and wireless network management.
     
    "The Router is a critical element for any modern network, and yet it often remains complicated to use. By leveraging our expertise in network attached storage and maximizing the user experience, Synology provides a pleasant, efficient, advanced solution for enthusiasts and professional users," said Derren Lu, chief executive officer of Synology Inc.
     
    Advanced networking tools
     
    The SRM Network Center application allows users to limit bandwidth consumption, block malicious content, setup parental controls, and fine-tune how data travels through your home or office network.
     
    ·Traffic Monitor – Provides intuitive and detailed graphic view on network resource allocation.
     
    ·Beamforming – User-controlled beamforming focuses wireless signals towards supported devices to: reduce latency, economize power consumption and improve the wireless range.
     
    ·Application Layer QoS – Allows users to control internet availability by device and networking applications.
     
    ·Parental Controls – Easily set up access times for each device and create built-in DNS based web filter.
     
     
     
    Never worry about speed bottlenecks even when multiple devices are connected to the network. The RT1900ac is equipped with three adjustable long-range antennas and uses the latest 802.11ac wireless technology which broadcasts both 2.4GHz and 5GHz signals for combined data transfer speeds of up to 1900mbps. The Synology Router RT1900ac boasts professional level networking tools, at a consumer-friendly price for homes and offices. Suggested retail price: $149.99.
     
     
     
    About Synology Inc.
     
    Founded in 2000, Synology creates network attached storage (NAS) and private cloud solutions that transform the way people share, manage, and backup data – at home and work. The company has an extensive line of NAS: from 1-bay desktop units (DiskStations) – to rackmounts (RackStations) that scale up to 1.4PB.  The products are ideal for consumers, small- and medium-sized business (SMB), and small- and medium-sized enterprise (SME).  All of Synology’s private cloud solutions come with the intuitive DiskStation Manager (DSM) operating system.
     
     
     
    Synology NAS are an exceptional value with free add-on packages for file sharing, syncing, backup, multimedia streaming, photo management, VPN setup, and more. The storage devices also include built-in encryption, antivirus protection, warranties, free software upgrades, and online support. Products are feature rich, easy-to-use, energy efficient, reliable, and affordable. For more information visit: www.synology.com
    Joe_Miner

    By Joe_Miner, in HP Microserver,

    By: JohnStutsman
     
     
     

     
    Figure 1 – It Works! I now have my iLO4 IP Address and I see that I have 8GB RAM with a Xeon E3-1240v5 in a ML30 Gen9
     
     
     
    Dave, Schoondoggy and I have been talking to HPE about their Server products and how we, as enthusiasts, use them in our home environments. Not long ago HPE offered to send us a HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 (“ML30”) to test and comment on. We, of course, jumped at the opportunity!
     
    As luck would have it the ML30 arrived at my house when I was out of town visiting family in another state. Fortunately, my neighbor signed for the package and stored the ML30 in her garage – thus protecting the ML30 from the freezing rain and snow over the next few days until I got back home.
     
    I hurriedly got the ML30 as soon as I could – and what you see here are only my very initial reactions and comments – I should learn more and be able to share more as I try out various OS’s and configurations.
     
    After working so long with MicroServers, DL320e Gen8, and the ML10v2 I have found the ML30 very familiar with a form factor that is nearly identical to the ML10v2. While the ML30 is gaining a reputation as an ideal first server for a growing business my perspective will be that of a tech/home enthusiast/user.
     
    The HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 QuickSpecs and the Intel C236 Chipset information is very interesting and well worth reviewing.
     
    Things I found Interesting (exciting) in the QuickSpecs and Chipset information


    Six (6) SATA III (6Gb/s) ports off of the System Board (a mini SAS connector to a 4 SATA fan-out plus 2 individual SATA connections)
    RAM can be expanded to 64GB (It’s a constant theme I see in the Forums – everyone want “more” RAM and where users want a Home Server that can do double duty as a File Server, game server, video server, VM Host, IT training platform, home lab, and home IoT hub -- enthusiasts are constantly pushing the limits of their machines by combining as many different duties they could onto one machine.)
    Four (4) USB3 ports on the front (going from two (2) USB2 ports to four (4) USB3 ports on the front of the case is HUGE for many enthusiast)
    B140i embedded (looking forward to learning much more about this controller)
    iLO4 (after learning how to use iLO4 with my Gen8 MicroServer I have come to appreciate it on how quickly it allows me to get up to speed with a new Server with ILO4)
    SkyLake Xeon CPU in BASE Model (but as Page 4 of the Quickspecs shows [2/8/2016] there are 9 CPU’s supported by the ML30 G9: G4400, G4500, i3-6100, i3-6300, E3-1220v5, E3-1230v5, E3-1240v5, E3-1270v5, & E3-1240Lv5) The Base Model 824379-B21 comes with the Xeon E3-1220v5 and the Performance Model 830893-B21 comes with the Xeon E3-1240v5 – in between the Base and Performance Models is the “Smart Buy” Model 831065-S01 that comes with the Xeon E3-1230v5. I couldn’t find Passmark scores (Feb 8, 2016) for the Base and Smart Buy models but I expect the Xeon E3-1220v5 will perform above the E3-1220v3 which Passmark’s at 6,600 and there is a Passmark for the Performance Model Xeon E3-1240v5 at 10,477 while the Passmark for the Smart Buy Model Xeon E3-1230v5 is 10,234. I expect the Xeon E3-1230v5 would be in-between the E3-1220v5 and E3-1240v5 – giving all three Xeon’s very respectable performance for the enthusiast, in my opinion.
    Four PCIe slots (a HUGE luxury compared to the single PCIe slot I am used to with the G8 MicroServer – lots of possibilities here)
    The ML30 has a 3/1/1 Warranty (3 years parts, 1 year labor, and 1 year onsite support coverage) – I plan to learn more about how this impacts Firmware & Driver updates.
    I have yet to load an OS on the ML30 but I have powered it up successfully for the first time giving me an IP address so I can remote in with iLO4 and enabled me to check with Intelligent Provisioning ("IP") that my firmware was up to date.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 2 – Very familiar to the ML10v2 – the larger PSU in the Performance Model for the Hot-Swap drive cage is different but pictures of the Base Model look nearly identical to the ML10v2. Those at the HomeServerShow.com Meetup in Indianapolis last September 2015 will easily recognize this layout from when Schoondoggy did the unboxing of his ML10v2.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 3 – ML30 Gen9 has virtually identical form to the ML10v2 on right except for USB3 ports and differences in the drive cage
     
     
     
     
     
    Figure 4 – Three SATA Power connectors and One Molex Power connector up on top
     
     
     

     
    Figure 5 – view of Hot-Plug drive blank – will need to get Hot-Plug drive caddy
     
     
     

     
    Figure 6 – Rear view of ML10v2 on Left and ML30 Gen9 on Right
     
     
     
     
     
    Figure 7 – HPE setup information sheet that was packed with the HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 Server – before my first startup I highlighted what I thought were the important parts and checked out the links on my Surface 3 (and saved those links on my Surface 3 for future reference)
     
     
     
    Links that were on the HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 Server setup information sheet in Figure 7 above.


    Initial Setup Overview http://h22208.www2.hpe.com/eginfolib/servers/docs/enterprise/ML30Gen9/ML30Gen9-setup/system_setup_overview/setup.htm
    All Product Documentation http://h17007.www1.hpe.com/us/en/enterprise/servers/solutions/info-library/index.aspx?cat=gen9&subcat=ML30_Gen9#.Vr6AC2b2YuU
    Intelligent Provisioning User Guide http://h17007.www1.hpe.com/us/en/enterprise/servers/solutions/info-library/index.aspx?cat=hp_intelligent_provisioning#.Vr6Ab2b2YuU
    Service Pack for ProLiant (SPP) http://h17007.www1.hpe.com/us/en/enterprise/servers/products/service_pack/spp/index.aspx
     
     

     
    Figure 8 – While going through Post the power meter is showing in this instance about 41W.
     
     
     

     
    VIDEO 1 – Unboxing my HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 Server
     
     
     

     
    Figure 9 – While comparing the Passmark Performance scores for the Base, Smart Buy and Performance model Xeon’s of the ML30 G9 to previous Servers I’ve used I couldn’t find a score for the E3-1220v5 but would expect it to be above 6,600 of the E3-1220v3 in the ML10v2 which is very robust in my assessment.
     
     
     
    Currently, the prices for the Base and Performance models of the ML30 Gen9 appear widely dispersed but at HomeServerShow.com we do try to alert each other of deals via the deal thread in the forums. Such as this thread.
     
    In conclusion, I really like the build quality of the ML30 Gen9 and look forward to trying different configurations with the ML30 in the near future. Stay tuned!
     
    Please join us in the HomeServerShow Forums with any Questions or Comments.
     
     
     
    As Built (Computer Name: VANGUARD):


    HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 (Product No. 830893)
    Xeon E3-1240v5 (SkyLake LGA 1151)
    8GB ECC RAM (Expandable to 64GB)
    B140i Dynamic Smart Array
     
     
    Reference:
     
    HPE’s Initial Setup Overview http://h22208.www2.hpe.com/eginfolib/servers/docs/enterprise/ML30Gen9/ML30Gen9-setup/system_setup_overview/setup.htm
     
    Verify Operating System Support http://www8.hp.com/us/en/products/servers/management/operating-environments/index.html
     
    Operating System Support Matrices http://www8.hp.com/us/en/products/servers/management/operating-environments/os-support-matrix.html
     
    HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 Server User Guide http://h20564.www2.hpe.com/hpsc/doc/public/display?docId=c04905978
     
    HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 Server QuickSpecs http://h20195.www2.hp.com/v2/GetDocument.aspx?docname=c04834998&doctype=quickspecs&doclang=EN_US&searchquery=&cc=us&lc=en
     
    HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 Server http://www8.hp.com/us/en/products/proliant-servers/product-detail.html?oid=1008556812#!tab=features
     
    HPE Dynamic Smart Array B140i RAID Controller User Guide http://h20565.www2.hpe.com/hpsc/doc/public/display?sp4ts.oid=5293147&docId=emr_na-c04441385&lang=en-us&cc=us&docLocale=en_US
     
    Intel C236 Chipset http://ark.intel.com/products/90594/Intel-GL82C236-PCH
     
    The HPE ProLiant ML30 Gen9 Server for Business http://community.hpe.com/t5/Coffee-Coaching/The-HPE-ProLiant-ML30-Gen9-Server-the-ideal-first-server-for/ba-p/6824263#.Vr48Fo-cEuW
     
    ML10 & ML10v2 Forums at HSS: http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/forum/98-ml10-and-ml10v2/
    Joe_Miner
    By: JohnStutsman
     
     
     

     
    Figure 1 – Schoondoggy Drive Mount (“SDM”) – R3 for the HP ProLiant Gen8 MicroServer
     
     
     
    The Schoondoggy Drive Mount (“SDM”) is used to mount additional HDD’s and SDD’s inside the HP ProLiant Gen8 MicroServer beyond the 4 positions provided in the main 4 drive bay and the space in the ODD area of the MicroServer. When used with the Schoondoggy Stacking Bracket (“SSB”) up to 4 drives can be mounted on the SDM-R3. The SDM-R3 is provided with mounting holes for 3 optional fans to help cool a card (such as a Video Card or a P222) in the MicroServer expansion slot and the HDDs/SSDs mounted on the SDM-R3.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 2 – Top view of SDM-R3 with four (4) 2.5” 9.5mm HDD’s mounted using the 9.5mm SSB’s.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 3 – Overhead view of SDM-R3 with four (4) 2.5” 9.5mm HDD’s mounted using the 9.5mm SSB’s.
     
     
     
     
     
    Figure 4 – Side view of SDM-R3 with four (4) 2.5” 9.5mm HDD’s mounted using the 9.5mm SSB’s.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 5 – view of SDM-R3 with four (4) 2.5” 9.5mm HDD’s mounted using the 9.5mm SSB’s with Cable connections.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 6 – SDM-R3 with four (4) 2.5” 9.5mm HDD’s Attached to the PSU side of my HP ProLiant Gen8 MicroServer. The Bottom edge of the P222 Controller Card in the PCIe slot can be see behind the SDM-R3.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 7 – SDM-R3 with four (4) 2.5” 9.5mm HDD’s Attached to the PSU side of my HP ProLiant Gen8 MicroServer. Two 7mm Samsung SSD’s mounted together with a 7mm SSB set sitting on the Static Mat beside my MicroServer.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 8 – My HP ProLiant Gen8 MicroServer with SDM-R3 powered up. Note that Power meter is showing 78.5W. Normally, the power meter displays consumption in this configuration between 75-105W.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 9 – iLO4 Storage information showing the three Logical Drives off of the B120i Dynamic Smart Array Controller as well as the single Logical Drive off of the P222/512 FBWC Dynamic Smart Array Controller Card that is driving the four HDD’s mounted on the SDM-R3.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 10 – iLO4 Temperature data with 27% system fan speed set in BIOS on Increased Cooling.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 11 – iLO4 Temperature Graph with 27% system fan speed set in BIOS on Increased Cooling.
     
     
     

     
    VIDEO 1 – SDM-R3 (“Schoondoggy Drive Mount – R3”) on my HP ProLiant Gen8 MicroServer
     
     
     
    In conclusion, I really like the quality of the SDM-R3 and using the SDM-R3 I can now install, for the first time, four (4) 2.5” HDD’s that are 9.5mm thick. This is huge, in my opinion. Using the two (2) 30mm blower fans on the HDD’s and the 30mm fan that directs through the cutout towards the P222 heat sink appears to cool the controller card adequately (the chipset did get up to 55C but the Controller Card (PCI 1) was below 60C) during my testing.
     
    You can find the SDM-R3 and other products in the Schoondoggy Store.
     
    Please join us in the HomeServerShow Forums with any Questions or Comments.
     
     
     
    As Built (Computer Name: MACHINE):


    HP ProLiant Gen8 MicroServer
    Xeon E3-1265Lv2 (LGA 1155)
    16GB ECC RAM
    B120i Logical Drive 01: OS Drive – 1 x Corsair GT 240GB RAID0 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – 1 x Icy Dock EZConvert Air – mounted in Slots 1 of 4 drive main cage – Port 1 SATA III (6GB/s)
    B120i Logical Drive 02: Data Drive – 1 x WD VelociRaptor WD1000DHTZ 1TB RAID0 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – mounted in Slot 2 of 4 drive main cage – Port 2 SATA III (6GB/s)
    B120i Logical Drive 03: Data drive – 2 x Seagate ST3000DM001 3TB HDDs RAID1 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – ports 3-4 SATA II (3GB/s) – mounted in Slots 3 & 4 of 4 drive main cage
    P222 Logical Drive 01: Data Drive – 4 x WD10JUCT RAID5 on HP Dynamic Smart Array P222/512FBWC RAID Controller – Ports 1-4 SATA III (6GB/s) – mounted on SDM-R3
    SDM-R3 (Schoondoggy Drive Mount Revision 3)
    2 x 9.5mm SSB (Schoondoggy Stacking Bracket)
    2 x 30mmx10mm Blower Fans Delta Electronics BFB0312HA (fan connector attached) and mounting hardware
    1 x 30mmx15mm Fan Sunon MC30151V1-000U-A99 MagLev B5635R (fan connector attached) and mounting hardware
    2 x Molex to Molex Y power Splitter
    2 x Molex to SATA Y power Splitter
    Forward SFF-8087 Cable (I used: StarTech Model SAS8087S450 50cm Serial Attached SCSI SAS Cable – SFF-8087 to 4x Latching SATA)
    3 x Molex to Fan connector
    OS: Windows 8.1 Pro x64 with HyperV Enabled
    In ODD space for additional drive later: Dell MX714 Floppy FDD to SATA power connector; 1 x SATA 18” Data cable from System Board ODD SATA Port (B120i) to ODD Space
     
     
    Reference:
     
    Reference (important – please review):
     
    SDM-R3 Prototype – Forum Post with Pictures and Drawing http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/5960-hp-ms-g8-25-drive-bracket-prototype-rev2-info-new-rev-3-info/?p=108589  http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/5960-hp-ms-g8-25-drive-bracket-prototype-rev2-info-new-rev-3-info/?p=109829 http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/5960-hp-ms-g8-25-drive-bracket-prototype-rev2-info-new-rev-3-info/?p=109892
     
    SDM-R2 Review: Testing and Wrap-Up – HP ProLiant Gen8 MicroServer http://homeservershow.com/sdm-r2-review-testing-and-wrap-up-hp-proliant-gen8-microserver.html
     
    SDM R2 prototype -- Forum Post: http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/5960-hp-ms-g8-25-drive-bracket-prototype-new-rev2-info/?p=95220
     
    SSB Schoondoggy Stacking Brackets – Forum Post:   http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/8993-schoondoggy-stacking-brackets/?p=97099
     
    For good background information and accessory parts lists see: SDM R1 SGDM-SDM Pre-Production Review: HP ProLiant Gen8 MicroServer http://homeservershow.com/sgdm-sdm-pre-production-review-hp-proliant-gen8-microserver.html
     
    For good background information and accessory parts lists see: SDM R1 Pre-Production -- Forum Post: http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/5960-hp-ms-g8-25-drive-bracket-prototype/page-4#entry76824
     
    For good background information and accessory parts lists see: SDM Beta: The Schoondoggy Gen8 Drive Mount for the HP ProLiant Gen8 MicroServer First Look http://homeservershow.com/schoondoggy-gen8-drive-mount-hp-proliant-gen8-microserver-first-look.html
     
    Schoondoggy Store: http://homeservershow.com/hp-microserver-gen8-drive-bracket.html
     
    Check out the Gen8 links: http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/5639-proliant-microserver-gen8-links/
     
    Check out the Gen8 Blog postings: http://homeservershow.com/tag/gen-8
     
    Check out the MicroServer Blog postings: http://homeservershow.com/tag/microserver
     
    Video Playlist – Schoondoggy Gen8 Drive Mount for HP ProLiant Gen8 MicroServer
    Dave
    A whole bunch of security cameras and LED lighting on this episode.  We also talk some Celeron based Synology and how Media Center failed me during Super Bowl 50.  If you like the Automation thing be sure to stop by:
     
    http://homeautomationforums.com
     
    Circle by Disney Review
     
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    CES Day 1 -
     
    Reolink IP Camera
     
    Amcrest IP Camera
     
     
    Dave
    I'm back! Discussing new OEM hardware and the striking resemblence to a certain Microsoft Tablet.  Other nice hardware announcements from CES 2016. Talking Surface Book and my one regret with mine.  Listen in and see you in the forums.
     
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    Show Sponsor - Circle. I bought this cool little box that can pause the internet. Hey Kids, time for dinner. Bam, internet paused. Check out my complete review here - http://homeservershow.com/review-circle-with-disney.html

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    LG Gram
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    Dave

    By Dave, in Blog,

    Welcome to 2016 Home Server Show listeners! Fun episode to start you off with.  Jim Collison, Mike Faucher, and Kevin Schoonover join to listen to me go on and on about all kinds of stuff.
     
    Meetup 16
     
    HSS HQ Move
     
    The Neat Scanner Review Debacle
     
    The Geeks Network Review Team Assemble!
     
    Video Changes Coming
     
    Backups Rock. I killed my WordPress install and saved it with yes, a backup.
     
    And lastly, CES 2016. My thoughts. My experience. My Hotels and more.  Q&A on some vendors I met up uwith.
     
    It's a long show but we had some fun putting it together.  Enjoy and see you in the forums!
     
    Do you have a blog? Monetize it without running ugly ads.
     
    Remember and use these links to shop with!
     
    Amazon – http://homeservershow.com/amazon
     
    NewEgg – http://homeservershow.com/newegg
     
    Woot – http://homeservershow.com/woot
     
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    This podcast is a member of The Geeks Network.  Check out other great podcasts and forums there.
     
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    Joe_Miner
    By: JohnStutsman
     
     
     

     
    Figure 1 – Windows 8.1 Pro Installed onto my HP ProLiant ML10v2
     
     
     
    I was impressed with how easy it was to install Windows Server 2012 R2 on my HP ProLiant ML10v2 as well as the performance of the ML10v2 as described in Parts 1 through 6 of Setting up my HP ProLiant ML10v2 for the first time.  I wanted to see if installing Windows 8.1 Pro would go as easily. I was not only pleasantly surprised by the ease of installing Windows 8.1 but apparently my ML10v2 is ready to upgrade to Windows 10 Pro.
     
    Downloading the most current HP Service Pack ProLiant version 2015.10.0 and the most current B120i driver CP024079.exe were instrumental in the ease of my success. (Note: the HP Service Pack ProLiant (“SPP”) is an “Entitlement Required” Application so I needed to register my ML10v2 warranty or link it to my HP Support Center Profile.)
     
    Unless otherwise stated all ISO files I ran in iLO4 attached to my ML10v2 as virtual image files CD ROM/DVD and folders were attached as virtual folders


    Ran HP Service Pack ProLiant (“SPP”) ISO file in Automatic Mode to make sure all firmware was up to date
    Ran SPP in Interactive Mode and selected HP Smart Storage Administrator (“SSA”) to create a Logical Drive (“LD”) that I can load my OS (i.e. Windows 8.1 Pro update) onto
    Created LD01 with 1 Samsung Pro 840 SSD in RAID0
    Left remaining 4 HDDs and 1 SSD unallocated
    Shut down the machine
     
     
    Next I did the actual Windows 8.1 Pro installation


    Attached Windows 8.1 Pro x64 update (“W8.1”) ISO
    Attached folder containing B120i Driver I extracted from CP024079.exe with 7-Zip
    I Signed in using a Local Account to make it easier for me to run SPP later (I could always add a MS account later)
    I selected “Later” for the Windows 10 update so as to focus on the Windows 8.1 installation, YMMV – NOTE: When I went to Windows Update to begin downloading important Windows 8.1 updates I had to go under “Optional Updates” and deselect the Windows 10 update – Unfortunately, every time I went to Windows Update the Windows 10 Update was again selected so I would have to deselect it again. I found a solution at the SuperSite for Windows – I uninstalled update KB3035583 and then hid it as specified at http://winsupersite.com/windows-10/how-stop-windows-10-upgrade-downloading-your-system
    I next:

    Changed screen resolution (personal preference YMMV);
    Ran NETPLWIZ (personal preference YMMV – for the first few days there will be a lot of reboots so this is just a time saver for me);
    Set Time Zone (personal preference YMMV);
    Enabled Hyper-V (personal preference YMMV – this will be in my home lab);
    Reboot;
    Set Computer Name (personal preference YMMV);
    Reboot;
    Began running recommended Updates – multiple reboots;


    Finally, I opened SPP in Windows so I could run HP Smart Update Manager (“HPSUM”)


    When all Windows 8.1 updates are done then I attached SPP and ran HPSUM in Windows to update &/or add missing Drivers including SSA
    In Windows 8.1 ran SSA to set-up additional LD’s
     
     

     
    Figure 2 – Device Manager before HPSUM Execution
     
     
     
     
     
    Figure 3 – HPSUM Deployment Done
     
     
     

     
    Figure 4 – Device Manager after HPSUM execution
     
     
     

     
    Figure 5 – HP Smart Storage Administrator (“SSA”) display of the Three Logical Drives – SSA was executed from SSA App in Windows 8.1 Pro after HPSUM
     
     
     

     
    Figure 6 – iLO4 Health Summary Information
     
     
     

     
    Figure 7 – iLO4 Temperature Profile while fan speed was at 6%
     
     
     

     
    Figure 8 – iLO4 Device Inventory
     
     
     

     
    Figure 9 – iLO4 Storage information showing the three Logical Drives off of the B120i Dynamic Smart Array Controller as well as location of Physical Drives associated with each Logical Drive
     
     
     

     
    Figure 10 – iLO4 Firmware information after HPSUM
     
     
     

     
    Figure 11 – iLO4 HP Software Information after HPSUM
     
     
     

     
    Figure 12 – System Information
     
     
     

     
    VIDEO 1 – How I Installed Windows 8.1 Pro on my HP ProLiant ML10v2
     
     
     
    In conclusion, I really like the quality and performance of the ML10v2 and the ease of installing Windows 8.1 Pro.
     
    Please join us in the HomeServerShow Forums with any Questions or Comments.
     
     
     
    As-Built (I named my Computer: USS Papago):


    HP ProLiant ML10v2 Gen9
    Xeon E3-1220v3
    32GB Unbuffered ECC RAM KVR16E11K4/32
    Logical Drive 01: OS drive – 1 x Samsung 256GB 840 Pro SSDs in RAID0 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – 1 x Icy Dock EZConvert Air – mounted in Slot 1 of 4 drive main cage – Port 1 SATA III (6GB/s)
    Logical Drive 02: HyperV VMs – 1 x Samsung 256GB 840 Pro SSDs in RAID0 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – 1 x Icy Dock EZConvert Air – mounted in Slot 2 of 4 drive main cage – Port 2 SATA III (6GB/s)
    Logical Drive 03: Data drive – 4 x WD 5TB SE HDDs (WD5001F9YZ) in RAID10 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – ports 3-6 SATA II (3GB/s) – two mounted in Slots 3 & 4 of 4 drive main cage – two mounted in 5.25” bays using 5.25” to 3.5” adaptor brackets (I used the existing SATA cable that had gone to the optical drive for 1 5.25” bay plus another 18” SATA cable I had in stock from previous projects for the 3.5” HDD in the other 5.25” bay)
    OS: Windows 8.1 Pro
     
     
    Reference:
     
    Forum Thread: Installing Windows 8.1 Pro x64 on my ML10v2 http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/10527-installing-windows-81-pro-x64-on-my-ml10v2/
     
    Setting up my HP ProLiant ML10v2 for the first time, Part 6: Performance http://homeservershow.com/setting-up-my-6-performance.html
     
    HP ProLiant ML10v2 User Guide http://h20566.www2.hpe.com/hpsc/doc/public/display?sp4ts.oid=7796450&docId=emr_na-c04622279&docLocale=en_US
     
    HP ProLiant ML10v2 Server Drivers & Software https://h20564.www2.hpe.com/hpsc/swd/public/readIndex?sp4ts.oid=7796452&swLangOid=8&swEnvOid=4168&lang=en&cc=us&hpappid=hppecf
     
    HP Dynamic Smart Array Bi20i Controller Drivers & Software https://h20565.www2.hpe.com/hpsc/swd/public/readIndex?dwf.restartSession=true&sp4ts.oid=5293150&hpappid=hppecf&lang=en&cc=us
     
    Blog Postings HP ProLiant ML10v2 http://homeservershow.com/?s=ml10v2
     
    My HP ProLiant ML10v2 PlayList:
    Dave

    By Dave, in Blog,

    The Wi-Fi airwaves are heating up here at CES 2016.  D-Link made several announcements today, including a new line of high performance Wi-Fi routers, an all-new Unified Home Wi-Fi Network Kit with Adaptive Roaming Technology, and expanded DIY home automation solutions.

    D-Link Launches Unified Home Wi-Fi Network Kit with Adaptive Roaming Technology: As more wireless devices are being used throughout the home with high bandwidth applications, such as streaming HD video and online gaming on multiple devices simultaneously, users need a home network that can keep up with their demands. The Unified Home Wi-Fi Network Kit with Adaptive Roaming Technology (DKT-891) is a router-extender kit designed to address the need for full home wireless coverage. Using intelligent adaptive roaming technology, connected devices will automatically hop between the router and extender based on which connection will provide the best performance, allowing users to move throughout the home without having to configure or worry whether they’re getting the best connection and performance from their network.

     

    D-Link Launches New Line of EXO Routers Featuring Premium Design and Powerful Performance: Comprised of two routers, the AC1900 Wi-Fi Router (DIR-879) and the AC1750 Wi-Fi Router (DIR-869), the EXO series blends exceptional design with powerful 11AC home networking performance to provide impressive speed and coverage for an affordable price. With high-power amplifiers designed to maximize range, and gigabit ports for wired connectivity, the EXO routers provide whole-home coverage for your Smart Home’s many connected devices. The AC1900 router also includes SmartConnect technology to automatically assign clients to the wireless band providing the best bandwidth.

     

    D-Link Expands the mydlink® Home Ecosystem With Wi-Fi Based Alarm Detector: The mydlink® Smart Alarm Detector (DCH-S165) is a Wi-Fi based detector that monitors and identifies the sounds of standard UL-certified smoke or CO alarms. The Smart Alarm Detector easily connects to an existing Wi-Fi network and by placing it within 50 feet of smoke or CO alarms, it accurately detects the temporal sounds and sends a mobile push notification if either of the alarms sound. All of the D-Link Connected Home solutions, including the Smart Alarm Detector, work with the free mydlink Home app for iOS® and Android® smartphones and tablets, allowing users to control devices all from one screen.

     

    D-Link Adds IFTTT Support to mydlink® Connected Home Ecosystem: Committed to the advancement of today’s Connected Home, D-Link incorporates IFTTT (If This Then That) on the mydlink® Home app across a suite of Connected Home devices including Wi-Fi Smart Plugs, Water and Motion Sensors, Wi-Fi Siren and the new Smart Alarm Detector. IFTTT support enables users to create conditional commands and link multiple IFTTT products and apps together for a completely customizable home automation experience.
    Joe_Miner
    By: JohnStutsman
     
     
     

     
    Figure 1 – Passmark CPU Performance Index Comparison of ML10v2 to MicroServer and MediaSmart CPU’s. I used the available Average scores from Passmark as of 12/16/2015. The individual CPU Mark for my ML10v2 was 5,899; see: http://www.passmark.com/baselines/V8/display.php?id=52492748135 Forum member IAndrews found that the difference may be the result of HP and/or Windows power saving modes http://homeservershow.com/forums/index.php?/topic/10445-adding-4-5tb-hdds-to-my-ml10v2/?p=109833
     
     
     
    In Part 6 of Setting up my HP ProLiant ML10v2 for the first time I post the results of some of my early performance tests in addition to the PassMark scores in Figure 16 of Setting up my HP ProLiant ML10v2 for the first time, Part 5: Add Four 5TB HDDs. See also Figure 1 above.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 2 – Performance of Logical Drive 01 made of two Samsung 256GB 840 Pro SSDs in RAID0 on the B120i. This is my OS drive.
     
     
     
    In Figures 2 & 3 I ran performance tests on my Logical Drives 01 & 02 (see As-Built at the end of this article) using ATTO, Crystal Disk Mark, and HD Tune Pro.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 3 – Performance of Logical Drive 02 made of four Western Digital 5TB Enterprise drives in RAID10 on the B120i. This is my Data drive. The Target for the NASPT will be on this Drive.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 4 – I did a LAN Speed Test between my ML10v2 (Computer Name: USS Papago) to my Home Server (HAL-9000)
     
     
     
    After the LAN Speed Test I measured the performance of the ML10v2 (See As-Built at the end of this article) using the Intel NAS Performance Toolkit v1.7.1 (“NASPT”) Tests.
     
     
     
    Description of NAS Performance Toolkit (“NASPT”) Tests
     
    The NAS Performance Toolkit (“NASPT”) was developed and described by Tony Bock, Mason Cabot, Frank Hady, and Matthew Shopsin of the Storage Technologies Group, Intel Corporation, in the paper Measuring and Improving Single-User NAS Performance. (This is the same test that I’ve done previously on MicroServers, my MediaSmart Server, my home built Home Server and my Gen8 MicroServer.)
     
    Portions of their abstract states:

    NAS devices are increasingly entering the home and small business as centralized storage resources for large collections of documents, pictures, music and videos. Increasingly these devices are used for more than background tasks like backup. Newer interactive usages, like media access/creation, expose the performance of the NAS directly to the user. Unlike the enterprise NAS, the home and small business NAS will be judged primarily by single user performance as seen in user wait time.

    We introduce a new tool, the NAS Performance Toolkit (NASPT), uniquely built to measure the single user NAS Performance seen by a user of a mainstream personal computer. NASPT includes a wide range of workloads identified by our analysis of media, productivity and bulk data operations likely to drive single user NAS performance.

    We’ve made NASPT very easy to use and freely available. ….
    A number of tests are provided with the NASPT. Below is a listing of those tests used in this report.


    HD Video Playback: Traced from a commonly available video playback application, this trace represents about ten minutes of 720p high definition MPEG-2 video playback. A single 1.3GB file is accessed sequentially with 256kB user level reads. As is true in many of the workloads the NAS itself sees smaller reads since the SMB client and file system break these 256kB requests into smaller requests.
    HD Video Record: This trace represents recording roughly fifteen minutes of a broadcast 720p MPEG-2. A single 1.6GB file is written sequentially with 256kB access. The bit rate is somewhat lower than the playback test, they contain different video.
    HD Video Play & Record: This test was algorithmically constructed from the above video playback and record traces. To combine we introduced a 50ms offset into the record stream then merged the two streams. The 1GB file represents four minutes twenty seconds of application run time. Because the two streams have differing bit rates and because of variation in original trace periodicity, there is not a strict alternation of accesses. About 20% of the transactions are sequential.
    Two HD Video Playback Streams: Constructed from two copies of the above HD Video Playback test, this trace transfers 1.4GB of data representing two video streams played back for about six minutes. Again, sometimes one stream will issue two transactions in rapid succession so about 18% of the transactions are sequential.
    Four HD Video Playback Streams: This workload is constructed from four copies of the video playback test. The 1.3GB trace represents about three minutes forty-five seconds of video playback for each stream. About 11% of the accesses are sequential.
    Content Creation: This is a trace of commercially available video and photo editing software products executing a scripted set of operations to produce a video from a collection of different source materials. It contains a single very large file, apparently containing the video output, which is written in bits and pieces. About 11% of accesses within this file are sequential. There are many smaller files that are read and written more or less sequentially. Overall, about 40% of the accesses are issued sequentially. The test transfers 155MBs, 90% of transactions are writes. The median read size is 1300 bytes. The median write is 12kB. Transfers include a wide range of different sized accesses.
    Office Productivity: Scripted sequences of typical workday operations from a commonly available office productivity suite make up this trace. This test is the largest of the collection, transferring 2.8GB of data evenly divided between reads and writes. Eighty percent of these accesses are logically sequential, scattered across six hundred files ranging from 12 bytes in length to over 200MB. The median read size is 2.2kB whereas the median write size is 1.8kB.
    File Copy To NAS: This trace includes accesses executed when copying a 1.4GB file to a NAS. Data is written in 64kB sequential transactions.
    File Copy From NAS: Identical to File Copy To NAS, but in the opposite direction. All transactions are sequential 64kB reads.
    Directory Copy To NAS: This trace represents a bulk copy of a complex directory tree containing 2833 files, a transfer a large collection of files to the NAS. The directory used represented a typical installation of a commercially available office productivity suite. 247MBs is transferred with an average write size of 41.4kB. Only 52% of the writes are logically sequential as many files are small.
    Directory Copy From NAS: Identical to File Copy To NAS, but in the opposite direction creating many read accesses.
     
     
    Specifications of Client Workstation that NASPT will operate from
     
    The Client Workstation that NASRT v1.7.1 will be operated from for these tests is specified as follows:


    Hyper-V Client: Windows 7 Professional SP1, x86 – NOTE: this is the SAME Hyper-V Client that has operated on previous tests but has been moved to a different Hyper-V Server
    2 CPU Cores have been allocated to the Client
    2GB RAM (locked to 2GB with dynamic memory turned off).
    Client VM and VHDX is the only client running on VHD Drive: a Logical Drive made of two 300GB VelociRaptor’s in RAID0
    The Client Workstation is hosted on my HP ProLiant Gen8 MicroServer, Xeon E3-1265Lv2, with 16GB RAM ECC KVR1333D3E9SK2/16G, (computer name: The Machine) operating under Windows 10 Pro with Hyper-V enabled.
    All VM’s on the Host have been shut down to provide the Client for this test exclusive access to the Virtual NIC bound to the 2nd NIC of the Gen8 MicroServer.
    The NIC’s of the Host and the NIC’s of the Target were connected to the same network switch: Netgear GS724T.
     
     
     
    Specifications of Target:
     
    The Target (Computer name: USS Papago) is a Share on Logical Drive 02 of the ML10v2 described in the following As-Built:


    HP ProLiant ML10v2 Gen9
    Xeon E3-1220v3
    32GB Unbuffered ECC RAM KVR16E11K4/32
    Logical Drive 01: OS drive – 2 x Samsung 256GB 840 Pro SSDs in RAID0 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – 2 x Icy Dock EZConvert Air – mounted in Slots 1 & 2 of 4 drive main cage – Ports 1 & 2 SATA III (6GB/s)
    Logical Drive 02: Data drive – 4 x WD 5TB SE HDDs (WD5001F9YZ) in RAID10 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – ports 3-6 SATA II (3GB/s) – two mounted in Slots 3 & 4 of 4 drive main cage – two mounted in 5.25” bays using 5.25” to 3.5” adaptor brackets (I used the existing SATA cable that had gone to the optical drive for 1 5.25” bay plus another 18” SATA cable I had in stock from previous projects for the 3.5” HDD in the other 5.25” bay)
    OS: S2012R2
     
     

     
    Figure 5 – Results of 5 NASPT Runs and the Median Score Note: these Benchmarks are useful for Comparisons with My specific testing setup, network, and Client Workstation implementation and should not be considered absolute benchmarks for comparison against another person’s results
     
     
     

     
    Figure 6 – Tabular Comparison of Median Scores for NASPT on my N40L & N54L MicroServers, my Home Server on a X58 board with a i7-930, my Gen8 MicroServer with a Xeon E3-1265Lv2, and my ProLiant ML10v2 with a Xeon E3-1220v3 Note: these Benchmarks are useful for Comparisons with My specific testing setup, network, and Client Workstation implementation and should not be considered absolute benchmarks for comparison against another person’s results
     
     
     

     
    Figure 7 – Graphical Comparison of Median Scores for NASPT on my N40L & N54L MicroServers, my Home Server on a X58 board with a i7-930, my Gen8 MicroServer with a Xeon E3-1265Lv2, and my ProLiant ML10v2 with a Xeon E3-1220v3 Note: these Benchmarks are useful for Comparisons with My specific testing setup, network, and Client Workstation implementation and should not be considered absolute benchmarks for comparison against another person’s results
     
     
     

     
    Figure 8 – Comparison of the devices in Figures 6 & 7 above normalized to the N40L MicroServer’s performance, i.e. the N40L’s performance was considered the baseline at 100% Note: these Benchmarks are useful for Comparisons with My specific testing setup, network, and Client Workstation implementation and should not be considered absolute benchmarks for comparison against another person’s results
     
     
     

     
    Figure 9 – iLO4 – Temperature information with fans at 6% while the NSAPT was being performed
     
     
     

     
    Figure 10 – Power usage at idle seems to fluctuate between approximately 52W and 65W.
     
     
     
    The ML10v2 doesn’t have the small form factor of the MicroServer but if a small form factor isn’t essential then I believe the ML10v2 offers a lot more “bang-for-the-buck” for the home enthusiast.
     
    As Figure 1 illustrates, the Xeon E3-1220v3 (LGA1150 socket) that is available in a stock HP ProLiant ML10v2 offers significant performance improvement for the home enthusiast over past stock CPU’s in MicroServer’s and MediaSmart Server’s. The 4 PCIe expansion slots of the ML10v2 also offers more flexibility for enthusiast projects.
     
    Interestingly from my perspective, I have a home server I built from my first i7 machine and the Xeon E3-1220v3 in the ML10v2 has a 24% performance advantage (PassMark 6,600 versus 5,184) over the i7-930 in my X58A-UD3H based home server!
     
    In conclusion, I really like the quality and performance of the ML10v2. Capable of being upgraded to 32GB of RAM and able to support 6 3.5” SATA drives right out of the box this machine has a lot of potential uses including home virtual lab, home server, and home NAS. My own plans in the immediate future is to try other OS’s and hardware on my ML10v2 with an eye down the road as either a home server/workstation or a home virtual lab.
     
    Please join us in the HomeServerShow Forums with any Questions or Comments.
     
     
     
    Reference:
     
    Setting up my HP ProLiant ML10v2 for the first time, Part 1: Unboxing and Setting up iLO4 Advance http://homeservershow.com/setting-up-my-p-ilo4-advance.html
     
    Setting up my HP ProLiant ML10v2 for the first time, Part 2: Installing my OS Drives and Running SPP http://homeservershow.com/setting-up-my-es-running-spp.html 
     
    Setting up my HP ProLiant ML10v2 for the first time, Part 3: Using iLO4 to Install Server 2012R2 http://homeservershow.com/setting-up-my-server-2012r2.html 
     
    Setting up my HP ProLiant ML10v2 for the first time, Part 4: Upgrade my RAM to 32GB http://homeservershow.com/setting-up-my-my-ram-to-32gb.html
     
    Setting up my HP ProLiant ML10v2 for the first time, Part 5: Add Four 5TB HDDs http://homeservershow.com/setting-up-my-four-5tb-hdds.html
     
    Setting up my HP ProLiant ML10v2 for the first time, Part 6: Performance http://homeservershow.com/setting-up-my-6-performance.html
     
    HP ProLiant ML10v2 User Guide http://h20566.www2.hpe.com/hpsc/doc/public/display?sp4ts.oid=7796450&docId=emr_na-c04622279&docLocale=en_US
     
    The PassMark Benchmark Scores on my build are at http://www.passmark.com/baselines/V8/display.php?id=52492748135
     
    NAS Performance Testing on my Gen8 MicroServer http://homeservershow.com/nas-performance-testing-on-my-gen8-microserver.html
     
    Blog Postings on NASPT http://homeservershow.com/?s=NASPT
     
    Blog Postings HP ProLiant ML10v2 http://homeservershow.com/?s=ml10v2
     
    My HP ProLiant ML10v2 PlayList:
     
     
    Joe_Miner
    By: JohnStutsman
     
     
     

     
    Figure 1 – Two of the 5TB HDDs are already installed in the two 5.25” bays and I’m putting the finishing touches installing the other two 5TB HDDs in the 4 Drive Cage next to the two Icy Dock EZConvert’s holding my 2.5” SSDs
     
     
     
    In Part 5 of Setting up my HP ProLiant ML10v2 for the first time I add four Western Digital 5TB HDDs to my ML10v2.
     
     
     

     
    Figure 2 – Showing the wiring of the SATA ports to the HDDs and SDDs
     
     
     

     
    Figure 3 – Front view of the case with two 3.5” HDDs mounted with adaptor brackets in the 5.25” openings
     
     
     

     
    Figure 4 – Case back on my ML10v2 and powered up – Note that total system load is 59W with 4 5TB HDDs, 2 SSDs, and 32GB RAM
     
     
     
    I add four Western Digital 5TB HDDs to my HP ProLiant ML10v2 and created a Logical Drive 02 – a data drive – in RAID10 on the HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller using the SATA II (3GB/s) Ports 3 thru 6. I used Slots 3 & 4 of the 4 drive main cage and the other two mounted in the 5.25” bays using 5.25” to 3.5” adaptor brackets. Logical Drive 01 – my existing OS drive – is two Samsung 256GB 840 Pro SSDs in RAID0 on the HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller using the SATA III (6GB/s) Ports 1 & 2. The SSDs are mounted in Slots 1 & 2 of the 4 drive main cage using two Icy Dock EZConvert Air’s.
     
     
     

     
    Video 1 – Adding 4 5TB HDDs to my HP ProLiant ML10v2
     
     
     

     
    Figure 5 – 4 5TB drives selected to create Logical Drive 02 in SSA (HP Smart Storage Administrator) on the Dynamic Smart Array B120i Controller in the ML10v2
     
     
     

     
    Figure 6 – About to Create 10TB RAID10 Logical Drive 02 from 4 5TB HDDs in SSA
     
     
     

     
    Figure 7 – 10TB RAID10 Logical Drive 02 Created in SSA
     
     
     

     
    Figure 8 – Configuration of Logical Drives in Dynamic Smart Array B120i Controller as seen in SSA (HP Smart Storage Administrator)
     
     
     

     
    Figure 9 – iLO4 – Storage Information showing Logical Drives 01 & 02 on the Dynamic Smart Array B120i Controller
     
     
     

     
    Figure 10 – In Disk Management the 10TB Logical Drive needs to be Initialized
     
     
     

     
    Figure 11 – 10TB unformatted Drive
     
     
     

     
    Figure 12 – 10TB Formatted Drive D
     
     
     

     
    Figure 13 – iLO4 – Temperature Information with System Fan speed at 6% -- very little noise IMO
     
     
     

     
    Figure 14 – iLO4 – Firmware Information
     
     
     

     
    Figure 15 – iLO4 – Software Information
     
     
     

     
    Figure 16 – The PassMark scores for my build are at http://www.passmark.com/baselines/V8/display.php?id=52492748135 what’s noteworthy IMO is the CPU Mark of 5,899, Memory Mark of 2,163, and the Disk Mark of 7,686. The low Graphic Mark’s were expected with the Matrox Chip and not really relevant IMO if this is being considered as a Home Server or NAS box.
     
    As-Built:


    HP ProLiant ML10v2 Gen9
    Xeon E3-1220v3
    32GB Unbuffered ECC RAM KVR16E11K4/32
    Logical Drive 01: OS drive – 2 x Samsung 256GB 840 Pro SSDs in RAID0 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – 2 x Icy Dock EZConvert Air – mounted in Slots 1 & 2 of 4 drive main cage – Ports 1 & 2 SATA III (6GB/s)
    Logical Drive 02: Data drive – 4 x WD 5TB HDDs in RAID10 on HP Dynamic Smart Array B120i RAID Controller – ports 3-6 SATA II (3GB/s) – two mounted in Slots 3 & 4 of 4 drive main cage – two mounted in 5.25” bays using 5.25” to 3.5” adaptor brackets (I used the existing SATA cable that had gone to the optical drive for 1 5.25” bay plus another 18” SATA cable I had in stock from previous projects for the 3.5” HDD in the other 5.25” bay)
    OS: S2012R2
    In Part 6 of Setting up my HP ProLiant ML10v2 for the first time I will post the results of some of my early performance tests in addition to the PassMark scores above in Figure 16.
     
    Please join us in the HomeServerShow Forums with any Questions or Comments.
     
     
     
    Reference:
     
    Setting up my HP ProLiant ML10v2 for the first time, Part 1: Unboxing and Setting up iLO4 Advance http://homeservershow.com/setting-up-my-p-ilo4-advance.html
     
    Setting up my HP ProLiant ML10v2 for the first time, Part 2: Installing my OS Drives and Running SPP http://homeservershow.com/setting-up-my-es-running-spp.html 
     
    Setting up my HP ProLiant ML10v2 for the first time, Part 3: Using iLO4 to Install Server 2012R2 http://homeservershow.com/setting-up-my-server-2012r2.html 
     
    Setting up my HP ProLiant ML10v2 for the first time, Part 4: Upgrade my RAM to 32GB http://homeservershow.com/setting-up-my-my-ram-to-32gb.html
     
    Setting up my HP ProLiant ML10v2 for the first time, Part 5: Add Four 5TB HDDs http://homeservershow.com/setting-up-my-four-5tb-hdds.html
     
    Setting up my HP ProLiant ML10v2 for the first time, Part 6: Performance http://homeservershow.com/setting-up-my-6-performance.html
     
    HP ProLiant ML10v2 User Guide http://h20566.www2.hpe.com/hpsc/doc/public/display?sp4ts.oid=7796450&docId=emr_na-c04622279&docLocale=en_US
     
    The PassMark Benchmark Scores on my build are at http://www.passmark.com/baselines/V8/display.php?id=52492748135
     
    Metal 3.5” to 5.25” Drive Adapter Brackets http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811993004&Tpk=N82E16811993004
     
    Icy Dock EZConvert Air http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817994169&Tpk=N82E16817994169
     
    Blog Postings HP ProLiant ML10v2 http://homeservershow.com/?s=ml10v2
     
    My HP ProLiant ML10v2 PlayList: